Yoshi’s Island: Super Mario Advance 3 (Nintendo Game Boy Advance)
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  • Super Mario Advance 2 certainly offers a more varied gameplay experience than Super Mario World
  • Yoshi's Island does do what Super Mario World did and incorporates exploration into its levels and exploration leads to secret areas and levels, and I like having to explore levels to unearth hidden areas and items because it makes the levels seem more full and gives me a reason to spend more time in levels rather than just go from point A to point B


    • by CirclingCanvas

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      Yoshi’s Island: Super Mario Advance 3 is a video game for the Nintendo Game Boy Advance. This video game originally appeared on the Super Nintendo Entertainment System under the title, “Yoshi’s Island: Super Mario World 2″. The “Super Mario World 2″ subtitle never really felt that appropriate considering how the level design and the characters weren’t very similar to what was seen in the first Super Mario World. Even the gameplay was different in some respects. In the sequel, Yoshi was controlled instead of Mario and Yoshi handled pretty differently from Mario what with his flutter jump and ground pound moves, plus, he could transform into vehicles. That’s all been retained in this updated version of the video game, including the feel of the video game which doesn’t resemble the feel of the first Super Mario World. Comparisons between the sequel and the earlier video game aside, Yoshi’s Island is a fairly entertaining video game. While the previous Super Mario Advance video games featured only minor additions, such as some extra coin challenges and item hunts, but no extra levels or changes to the existing levels, this video game thankfully breaks that trend. It’s the first in the Super Mario Advance series to feature the addition of some extra bonus levels upon completing the video game. It was fun to be able to

      play through some new levels in the video game, and I was pleasantly surprised to find that the new level additions offer some fun, creative challenges that took a few tries to get a handle on, such as needing to bounce from enemy to enemy a number of times to make it through a level or racing against the auto-scrolling screen while dodging platforms that will slow the player down. I liked how just as many of the normal levels combined platforming with puzzle solving, the new secret levels offer up this satisfying gameplay combination too.

      This video game doesn’t come across quite as vibrantly colorful compared to the console version, and even lacks some of the special visual effects that the console version sported. I suppose that is likely due to the Game Boy Advance’s hardware limitations. Also, a number of sound effects were changed. Why the sound effects were changed I can’t imagine, but the different sound effects do help make this video game feel a bit different from the console version. Most of the levels were untouched in this version of the video game, although there are some new areas and a few minor changes here and there. For the most part though, the levels offer the same platforming challenges and various obstacles as well as puzzles and opportunities to transform ...


      • into such vehicles as a helicopter, car or submarine. The challenges change depending on the level environment, with the cave levels requiring less platforming but more puzzle solving and the jungle areas demanding more platforming and generally feature more action. Some levels are very fast paced and require quick reflexes such as one level where Yoshi is on skis and racing down a snowy mountain while other levels demand patience and carefully timed jumps, such as levels that feature floating Fuzzies that can make Yoshi dizzy. Yoshi’s Island: Super Mario Advance 2 certainly offers a more varied gameplay experience than Super Mario World: Super Mario Advance 2, although Super Mario World features more levels overall and is the lengthier video game. Yoshi’s Island does do what Super Mario World did and incorporates exploration into its levels and exploration leads to secret areas and levels, and I like having to explore levels to unearth hidden areas and items because it makes the levels seem more full and gives me a reason to spend more time in levels rather than just go from point A to point B. It’s definitely a satisfying experience to come across secrets or hidden spots and that is one of the strengths both Super Mario World and Yoshi’s Island share.

        Although Yoshi’s Island: Super Mario Advance 3 features fewer levels

        and fewer secret areas and levels than Super Mario World: Super Mario Advance 2, this video game is still fun to play. It offers a different kind of gaming experience, such as being able to aim and throw eggs at enemies and to solve puzzles and being able to transform into different vehicles that handle differently to overcome obstacles while still incorporating platforming challenges and reasonably entertaining boss battles into the video game. The addition of the extra secret levels was very much welcomed and offers fresh challenges and fun tests, and that, combined with the extra areas here and there and a minor alteration or two to certain aspects of certain levels makes this version of Yoshi’ Island worth a player’s time even if he or she has already played and beaten the console version. Just be prepared because this handheld version doesn’t look as nice visually as the console version and the sounds have generally been changed. Despite the handheld version not looking as good as the console version and although Yoshi’s Island doesn’t feature as many levels or secret areas as Super Mario World, the video game still offers a pretty fresh and unique gameplay experience that’s varied and the addition of the extra secret levels in the handheld version was a terrific and welcomed surprise, so I’m rating this video game an “8″.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in October, 2010. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 287101288690231/k2311a107/10.7.10
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