Raising the Griffin by Melissa Wyatt book  » Books  »
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  • Because I identified with Alex so much, I thought the author didn't do a good job of making his parents - especially his father- understanding
  • There were two relationships that I enjoyed seeing develop
  • Their relationship is full of animosity, but it grows in interesting ways

    • by Angelwriter
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      How would you feel if you were a normal teenage boy one day, and the next, you were a prince? That’s basically the plot behind Melissa Wyatt’s young adult novel, Raising the Griffin. The Varenhoff family used to be the rulers of a small (fictional) country called Rovenia. But, long before Alex was born, the Soviets abolished the monarchy. He’s never even been to Rovenia. Now Rovenia is a free country again, and they want the royal family back. And Alex doesn’t like it a bit.

      I’ve always been interested in royalty, so this book got my interest immediately. But, I


      can never forget the downsides that must come with being royal. Especially if you became royal later in life and didn’t grow up in that environment. I thought this book captured all of that. From the little annoyances, like not being allowed to dress yourself, to the big ones of suddenly being uprooted from everything you were familiar with. Alex didn’t handle everything well, but I couldn’t help sympathize with him. I could also understand him feeling especially awkward about being treated like a movie star by crazy teenage girls. Fame is also something that has its downside, especially if you’re shy.

      • And especially if you never courted it.

        Because I identified with Alex so much, I thought the author didn’t do a good job of making his parents - especially his father- understanding. His attitude towards Alex seemed to be mainly “stop whining and deal with it.” I understand he was struggling to prove he could be a good king and their family was right for the country, but it didn’t seem very fatherly.

        There were two relationships that I enjoyed seeing develop. One was Alex’s friendship with Sophie, the daughter of the family’s PR agent. She could grasp why Alex wasn’t jumping for

        joy at the changes in his life. And she’s the only one who treated him like Alex, rather then a prince. The other person was Stephan, who was hired to train Alex in what it took to be a prince. Their relationship is full of animosity, but it grows in interesting ways.

        The book is concentrated all on how Alex deals with things. But, the author clearly put a lot of thought into the country she made up. There’s even snippets of the language she made up. That gave the book an air of authenticity. I recommend this book.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in October, 2010. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 175101286040331/k2311a105/10.5.10
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