Kershaw Leek 1660 Pocket Knife  » Other  »
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  • However it is, in my experience, adequately rust resistant
  • The versions with upgraded blade steels cost more, but if you are willing to pay for it, the extra performance can be worth the money
  • I think that in general the standard blade steel is fine, but the composite blade may be worth the extra money if only for aesthetics and the unique, innovative concept
  • I like a serrated edge personally, but the ability to sharpen the entirety of a fine edge blade sometimes outweighs the benefits of a serrated blade
  • I really like the look of the rainbow Leek, and if you like unique knives with a little character, it would definitely be worth a look

    • by strick284
      TRUSTWORTHY

      all reviews
      The Leek is one of the most popular knives in the entire Kershaw line, and for good reason. This review will focus on the tungsten DLC coated, stainless steel handled, serrated blade version of the knife, though there are many other configurations available. To start, I will just go over some quick technical specs. It weighs 3 oz., it has a 3″ blade, and it is 4″ long when closed. The blade is made of Sandvik 14C28N stainless steel, the handles are 410 stainless steel, and it is coated with Kershaw’s black non-reflective tungsten DLC coating. The knife has a thumbstud, finger flipper, Speedsafe assisted opening, safety, frame lock, half-serrated blade, and reversible tip up/down pocket clip.

      This is my favorite pocket knife; I carry it almost every day. The assisted opening is wonderful; the knife opens smoothly and easily every time with both the thumbstud and the flipper. At 3 oz, it is very lightweight and comfortable to carry. I rarely notice it in my pocket. The smooth assisted opening and light weight (which translates to comfortable carry) are my favorite features of the Leek. As with all Kershaw knives, the factory edge is excellent. The 14C28N stainless steel holds an edge well and sharpens without undue effort. The modified wharncliffe blade isn’t the most utility oriented one, but it provides a needle sharp point that is excellent


      for piercing cuts and other fine work. For most cutting tasks, the blade shape does well enough and it gives the knife a very attractive look. Without the clip (which is easily removed), and maybe with customized handles, it could make a good gentleman’s knife. The handle is very comfortable and ergonomic. Overall, it is just a sweet knife. It is a pleasure to use and carry. Leeks retail for anywhere from $50 to $85, depending on which version you want. This particular trim is probably $60 to $70. However, you can get a Leek much cheaper if you watch auctions on ebay for a while and you aren’t picky about which model you want.

      The knife does have its problems though. The needle point and overall thin blade profile does not translate to a stiff or strong blade. The Leek is virtually useless for prying, and it can be very easy to break the tip. It is not a heavy duty knife, but more like an every day pocket knife, or as I mentioned earlier, a gentleman’s pocket knife. Elegant and beautiful, albeit somewhat fragile. Also, the tungsten coating is not as scratch resistant as some other coatings like titanium nitride or baked on epoxy powder coats. However it is, in my experience, adequately rust resistant.

      There are other versions of the Leek available with ...


      • or without coatings, other blade steels, other handle materials/colors, and serrated or fine edge blades. There is a model just like this one except that it comes uncoated with a silver bead blasted finish. The uncoated blade is not as rust resistant, but uncoated blades tend to cut a bit better than coated ones. The versions with upgraded blade steels cost more, but if you are willing to pay for it, the extra performance can be worth the money. Note that there is a composite Leek that uses a blade fused together from two different steels. The composite creates a unique look and supposedly better cutting performance. I think that in general the standard blade steel is fine, but the composite blade may be worth the extra money if only for aesthetics and the unique, innovative concept. As for handles, there are versions with smoked aluminum handles that lighten the knife to 2.4 oz. and offer a different look with the colored smoke patterns. However, they use a steel leaf liner lock that is not quite as strong as the 410 stainless frame lock. There are also Leek models with pink 410 stainless steel handles. Serrated blades can improve cutting performance on especially tough materials, but they are virtually impossible to sharpen. I like a serrated edge personally, but the ability to sharpen the entirety of a fine edge blade sometimes
        outweighs the benefits of a serrated blade. Another note on a particularly unique Leek model: There is one with a special aluminum oxide coating that is finished entirely in brilliant rainbow colors. It comes with stainless steel handles and fine edge blade only. I really like the look of the rainbow Leek, and if you like unique knives with a little character, it would definitely be worth a look.

        My final recommendation on this series of knives really depends on what kind of knife you are looking for. If you want an every day carry knife, a gent pocket knife, or just a sweet knife to add to your collection or show off to your friends, then the Kershaw Leek is an excellent choice. But if you want a heavy duty knife, something to carry with you in the woods, strap to your gear when on police or military duty, or toss in your hiking pack, then the Leek is not it. Overall, this knife is of excellent quality per Kershaw’s standards. Excellent fit and finish, strong lockup, smooth operation, quality materials, and impeccable workmanship all combine to make this a great knife. No knife does everything, but what this knife does, it does very well.

        In short, this knife is excellent for every day carry, light duty, and gentleman’s knife applications. It is not recommended for heavy duty like police/military/rescue/survival use. Highly recommended otherwise.




    0
    keith says :

    thanks for this tip. This is exactly what i needed to hear to make this purchase. I will most likely remove the clip and keep it as an every day carry…or at least in my EDC rotation.

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