Mario Party 7 (Nintendo Gamecube)  » Games  »
3.5
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  • I was however disappointed to find that every time someone would land on the space, the same mini-game would play, a fruit card memory game
  • At times, these events can be, in my opinion, unfair because event after event can really cost the player in first, who may be repeatedly targeted just due to random bad luck
  • Unfortunately, much like the day and night system and Nintendo Microphone were underused in Mario Party 6, the eight-player mode is pretty much underused in Mario Party 7
  • There are of course traditional game boards to choose from, but only a couple, and as much as I like the game boards with different rules for collecting stars, I again wish that there would be an option to select either classic play or new play for all the game boards, which would give me the freedom to play all the game boards two different ways, and this was an option I wished for in Mario Party 6, too, but unfortunately didn't come available in Mario Party 7, as I had hoped it might
  • Even still, I enjoyed completing the single-player mode and unlocking some extras as well as playing through some of the other game modes, which focused more on the mini-games while incorporating some sort of event or competition, like log-rolling


    • by CirclingCanvas

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      Mario Party 7 is a video game for the Nintendo Gamecube. Mario Party 7 came packaged with the Nintendo Microphone when I purchased the video game, although at the time, I already had a Nintendo Microphone because one came packaged with Mario Party 6. I do feel that Mario Party 7 made better use of the Nintendo Microphone than Mario Party 6 did because more of the mini-games made use of the Nintendo Microphone and the mini-games generally made better use of the Nintendo Microphone too, such as one mini-game that requires a player to call out the names of several aquatic creatures from the Mario series in an effort to knock out all three players that are swimming in the sea. I also liked that a new space was added to the game boards that incorporated the Nintendo Microphone. I was however disappointed to find that every time someone would land on the space, the same mini-game would play, a fruit card memory game. I wish that the developers would have included three games rather than one for that special Nintendo Microphone game board space because even the Donkey Kong and Bowser mini-games have three different mini-games apiece, three that are single-player only and three that are multiplayer only, bringing the total for each up to six, while the Nintendo Microphone space only has one mini-game and that’s it. Also unlike Mario Party 6, there’s no obstacle course-like games to play while speaking commands into the Nintendo Microphone, and that was a bit disappointing as those obstacle courses in Mario Party 6 were both fun and challenging, especially two out of the three.

      Mario Party 7 introduces a new gameplay concept that I’m not really all that wild about. After every five turns now, Bowser appears and does something


      that sometimes affects only the player in first place, sometimes does something to the game board such as set up a store where a player will be forced to spend coins on a useless orb or destroy a bridge, or sometimes do something that affects everybody. At times, these events can be, in my opinion, unfair because event after event can really cost the player in first, who may be repeatedly targeted just due to random bad luck. Mario Party games have always incorporated an element of luck into the gameplay and in almost every Mario Party game, there’s always the possibility that a person in first could suddenly end up in last place or another ranking due to a chance event, but Mario Party 7, it’s guaranteed that Bowser will show up every five turns and cast misfortune on one or more people. It’s more annoying than fun, and sometimes, no matter how you may try to plan for the event to minimize the damage, Bowser still sometimes strikes a blow of the “steal from the rich, give to the poor” nature. I feel that there should have been an option to turn off these events. Another new gameplay concept introduced in Mario Party 7 is the eight-player mode. Unfortunately, much like the day and night system and Nintendo Microphone were underused in Mario Party 6, the eight-player mode is pretty much underused in Mario Party 7. For one thing, there aren’t even ten eight-player mini-games, so playing the mini-games with eight-players kind of gets old fast because the same eight or so mini-games will be played over and over again. There’s over seventy mini-games in Mario Party 7, and less than ten of the seventy is devoted to the eight-player format? That doesn’t seem right. Eight-players can ...

      • play together in teams in the main party mode, in some cases sharing the same control which can be awkward and a bit uncomfortable at times since the two people must sit or stand very close together or by handing the controller over, and then, handing it back come the next turn. The eight-player mode didn’t really work well, at least, for me.

        Mario Party 7 continues the trend established by Mario Party 6 and that trend is in regards to some game boards having special requirements in order to collect stars. One game board features three treasure chests and one holds a star, another contains coins and a third has a bomb in it, and players never know which treasure chest contains what, thus involving quite a lot of luck or at the very least coins in order to purchase many orbs to allow a person to reach multiple treasure chests or treasure chests often while another game board sports several windmills, and different windmills offer a different number of stars once purchased, but windmills can be stolen simply by investing in it more coins than the other player that currently owns it. There are of course traditional game boards to choose from, but only a couple, and as much as I like the game boards with different rules for collecting stars, I again wish that there would be an option to select either “classic” play or “new” play for all the game boards, which would give me the freedom to play all the game boards two different ways, and this was an option I wished for in Mario Party 6, too, but unfortunately didn’t come available in Mario Party 7, as I had hoped it might. The game boards can be played another way, in the single-player mode,

        where special conditions must be satisfied before the game can be won. I do kind of miss how in Mario Party 6, the single-player mode had unique game boards not accessible in multiplayer mode, while Mario Party 7 simply uses the same game boards for both the single-player and multiplayer modes. Even still, I enjoyed completing the single-player mode and unlocking some extras as well as playing through some of the other game modes, which focused more on the mini-games while incorporating some sort of event or competition, like log-rolling. The different modes were fun to explore and play from time to time.

        Nario Party 7 isn’t my favorite Mario Party game in the long-running series, but I still enjoy playing the video game. The orb system, left untouched from Mario Party 6, offers strategy and depth that heightens the amount of fun that I can get out of the video game and the Nintendo Microphone offers an entertaining, alternative means to enjoy the video game. The new eight-player mode can be cumbersome though considering how two players need to share a controller, requiring real close contact and thus limiting one’s ability to sit comfortably while playing the video game at times, plus, there’s not many eight-player games to choose from, which is disappointing. I liked the addition of the Donkey Kong and Bowser single-player games as those were generally fun to play and gave the Donkey Kong and Bowser characters something more to do. The every five turn automatic Bowser event could be irritating as out of the blue, Bowser could really ruin something for one or more players.

        Nonetheless, Mario Party 7 remains a solidly entertaining video game that I’m glad that I own and can still play when I want. I feel that this video game is, coincidentally, deserving of a “7″ rating.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in September, 2010. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 2821091273630430/k2311a0921/9.21.10
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