Suzanne Collins young adult novel “Mockingjay”
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  • Unfortunately, I can’t say that I enjoyed it in the same way I have the two previous novels in the cycle
  • What I take issue with is perhaps the centrality of the love triangle
  • Unfortunately, the romantic angle didn’t seem convincing, and was the least interesting of the plotlines

    • by Rachel Evans
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      Suzanne Collins’s “Mockingjay” was among the most waited for young adult novels of 2010 – or at least that’s what my book-related websites tell me. I have to admit they might be right, since I got my copy the day after the premiere as any fan girl would, and read it in just two days. Unfortunately, I can’t say that I enjoyed it in the same way I have the two previous novels in the cycle.

      The book begins where the previous one ended – Katniss, the protagonist, finds herself in District 13, which proves never to have been bombed, after all.


      Together with a handful of allies, she joins the district’s government in its attempts to fight the evil Capitol and its super-villain president, Snow.

      What appealed to me were the ways in which the novel continued the themes of the preceding volumes. Public opinion and the importance of the media don’t diminish in importance once the Hunger Games are no longer the primary plotline – even in real war, morale and therefore propaganda are very important, and Katniss becomes a tool in a new set of hands. I was also surprised by the moral complexity of the issues of revenge, desire ...


      • for power and loyalty as they were presented in the novel; for young adult, the story was not at all black-and-white. Allies could prove to be as treacherous as enemies, and war made everyone into a monster, not only the existing power structures, but the rebels as well.

        Moreover, Suzanne Collins proved to be willing to take risks with her readership by killing off characters I wouldn’t have predicted dead. Although a lot of the plot twists were somewhat predictable, Collins proves that in war no one is safe, not even beloved fictional characters.

        What I take issue with is perhaps

        the centrality of the love triangle. I see how this is the staple of young adult literature nowadays – Twilight has Jacob and Edwards, therefore Hunger Games have Peeta and Gale. Unfortunately, the romantic angle didn’t seem convincing, and was the least interesting of the plotlines.

        Overall, I would say Suzanne Collins does justice to her world and characters in the trilogy’s closing volume. I enjoyed the ride, despite a few bumps, and hope to read more popular literature equally passionate about moral and economic realities – and this passion is something which makes me forgive the story its other, small flaws.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in September, 2010. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 177091256650130/k2311a097/9.7.10
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