Nook Wi-fi Ebook Reader by Barnes and Noble
4.5
1 votes
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  • I like reading books and went for the Nook because I had a good experience subscribing to Barne’s & Noble’s magazine subscriptions and thought I could just consolidate all of my reading in one device
  • When I bought a nook, there were already plenty of firmware updates around so I can’t really say any personal account about the glitches noted in the first few versions
  • In terms of reading experience, the nook is quite readable
  • I have an android phone installed with the Aldiko reader software and I love that I can share the purchased books to other devices, however, the books in the receiving end become perishable and last only for a while
  • If you buy books definitely online – then I cannot recommend the nook especially for those who travel often


    • by jhunie

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      My older Sony ereader had finally deteriorated, the entire screen was partially washed out after it fell off a table. I like reading books and went for the Nook because I had a good experience subscribing to Barne’s & Noble’s magazine subscriptions and thought I could just consolidate all of my reading in one device. It might be irrelevant to say this, but I’m also partial to Android’s products despite the things I heard about the nook’s instability. When I bought a nook, there were already plenty of firmware updates around so I can’t really say any personal account about the glitches noted in the first few versions.

      In terms of reading experience, the nook is quite readable. The letters are fully customizable and the contrast between black and white tones is more defined. I’m still annoyed by the brief gray flash that is produced by ereaders as you turn between pages. Well, digital ereaders are generally built for day time reading because they have no backlighting. I have no choice but to read with ample lighting at night.


      Most of the free books I source out from the internet are rendered in PDF formats which I’d like to dub – ‘generic’ books and I read it in the nook with no problems, even for those DRM free files. The same applies for DRM free, standard epub files. I have an android phone installed with the Aldiko reader software and I love that I can share the purchased books to other devices, however, the books in the receiving end become perishable and last only for a while.

      The nook encompasses a fair range of digital book formats, such as PDF files and free ebooks or epubs that are widely available in the internet. Upon buying for an ideal ebook reader, it was crucial that I see both sides of the fence and Amazon’s kindle was more restrictive in supporting third party contents, or books made by ebook publishers other than Amazon. I also had problems reading books in PDF formats. I know the digital publishing business is burgeoning but I’m still surprised when I find plenty of books in ...


      • the internet which you can download for free. I resort to reading free stuff if I’m traveling and cannot purchase books in Barne’s and Noble’s database. My older copyrighted books courtesy of Sony’s market were also readable in the nook.

        The interface is touch-based located at the bottom panel of the nook’s screen. The screen is partitioned between the e-ink which displays the contents of the book and a capacitive touch screen below it. Going for a touch screen ereader was not really my objective, I just like the simplicity of its controls compared to the kindle. Turning a page using a swiping gesture on the touch screen is a bit laggy, I prefer the side buttons. It has 2 gigabytes of storage space, I often don’t count how many books I’ve squeezed in this device, both old and new but probably close to 500 already. Many of the books in my repository are pdf files which eat up a lot of memory.

        The life of my nook usually stretches longer than 2 weeks, in some occasions, reaching the 4th week.

        I don’t usually use the proprietary browser and wi-fi because I think it’s impractical, rather futile, so the battery life lasts longer. Browsing the internet is feasible in this device but what I find lamentable is the fact that I cannot purchase books outside the US. I do like Barne’s & Noble’s selection of magazine subscriptions, such as Vogue Numero and other seasonal books but some of them are region-specific. I travel a lot so my capacity to download books via the supposedly functional wi-fi is disabled. Thankfully this device isn’t very picky and I can just stack it with books purchased from stores in my reach.

        When shopping for ebook readers, the biggest consideration one must make is how you’re going to source out books. And that footnote should be the starting point of your choice. If you buy books definitely online – then I cannot recommend the nook especially for those who travel often; indefinitely – if you’re resourceful like me and can find free stuff online then the nook is your best bet. It costs 140 dollars.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in August, 2010. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 1628081246750631/k2311a0828/8.28.10
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