Sarah Callard’s 2008 “The Little Green Book of the Home: 250 Tips for an Eco Lifestyle”  » Books  »
4.0
1 votes
Are you familiar with this?
Feel free to rate it!
  • Another interesting item were the tips which presented some hard data
  • Nevertheless, I think that The Little Green Book of the Home contains some really valuable tips and suggestions for leading an eco-friendly life

    • by Rachel Evans
      TRUSTWORTHY

      all reviews
      In the age of the global warming and the BP oil spill, more and more people, myself included, become interested in behaving in a more eco-friendly manner. And although I sort my trash and don’t use plastic bags for my shopping, I suspect there are a lot more simple things I could do to make my life more green.

      According to the description on the back cover, Sarah Callard’s 2008 “The Little Green Book of the Home: 250 Tips for an Eco Lifestyle”, one of her four so-called “Little Green Books” appeared a perfect guide for people like me, who had some clues as to how be eco-friendly, but wanted


      to do more. However, I must say that I’m not wholly satisfied with Callard’s book.

      “The Little Green Book of the Home” is a smallish volume, printed on recycled paper, and containing 250 various tips and pieces of advice which can help you make your house ecological. Most of the tips take up about half a page, and are written in a simple way, which makes them all the more comprehensible and easy to implement in your life. Some of these are truly valuable and inspirational; I especially appreciated a recipe for home-made solution to clogged pipes. Another interesting item were the tips which presented some hard data: for instance, I never ...


      • knew how much energy in contrast to the light produced the regular light bulbs consume. Such and similar pieces of advice certainly make the reader think twice about turning off the light when they leave the room, or be more careful about running water.

        However, I have to say that the book could use some better organizing. There appears to be no order, thematic or otherwise, to the tips Callard presents. For example, there may be three hints about more ecological usage of the washing machine one right after the other, and then there will be one more - twenty pages later. What is more, simple (and cheap) tricks are mixed with

        much more complicated (and expensive) ones; using yoghurt cups for growing herbs and investing in wind-powered electricity don’t exactly go together, and yet you may find them right next to one another. Finally, some pieces of advice appear somewhat contradictory: Callard suggests thinking twice before buying a new kitchen appliance, and then readily advises her reader to invest in a dishwasher.

        Nevertheless, I think that “The Little Green Book of the Home” contains some really valuable tips and suggestions for leading an eco-friendly life. To make the matters even more green-conscious - and save some trees - I’d suggest buying the book together with some similarly-minded friends, and trying to implement Callard’s advice together.




    • Don't Be Nice. Be Helpful.

    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in August, 2010. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 1725081242890131/k2311a0825/8.25.10
    Your use of this website constitutes acceptance of the Terms & Conditions
    Privacy Policy