Saeco Odea Go Coffee Machine
2.5
1 votes
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  • The machine is pretty small, having dimensions of 11.5 W x 15 D x 14.5 H, which I find quite convenient because older machines have been quite clunky
  • I like how the lid is semi-transparent, this way, I can tell when the beans are about to run out
  • Eventually I notice that the coffee is really light
  • I love this feature because when I want to cut back on my coffee intake, or just have half a cup in the afternoon, I can control how much coffee I make
  • It is a good machine and has the ability to make good coffee, but it is definitely overpriced

    • by Stephanie Angeles
      TRUSTWORTHY

      all reviews
      The Saeco Odea Go is a three-in-one coffee machine that allows you to brew your coffee or espresso, steam your milk, and dispense hot water. The machine is pretty small, having dimensions of 11.5″W x 15″D x 14.5″H, which I find quite convenient because older machines have been quite clunky. We use our Odea Go in the office, and it sits neatly in a corner next to our microwave.

      The machine has several compartments, each having its own purpose. The top compartment is for dispensing coffee beans. I like how the lid is semi-transparent, this way, I can tell when the beans are about to run out. Despite this, I still forget to check sometimes. One downside to the Odea Go is it does not warn you when you are low on beans, only when you actually run out. Some days I come to work a bit more tired than usual and forget to check the beans. I start brewing my coffee; the machine whirs and grinds the beans (including the imaginary beans that it thinks are there). Eventually I notice that the coffee is really light. The machine kept going and did not notice that it was out of beans; only after it brewed my coffee-water did the “Out of Beans” warning light go off. Another downside is because the machine takes whole beans and has to grind them in order to brew the coffee, it makes quite a bit of noise. Despite the downsides mentioned, there are some good points too. The machine takes whole beans, which means you get to choose the quality of beans you buy. We normally get a medium roast bean, and the Odea Go grinds it and pumps out coffee that tastes like


      espresso.

      On the left of the machine is a compartment for holding water. Unlike the top compartment, this one is solid gray, so I cannot see where the water left is at. The water tank takes regular water, then the machine heats it up and forces it through the ground coffee, much like an espresso machine. The machine takes about a minute to warm up before it can brew a cup of coffee. I don’t mind the wait, but sometimes it feels like forever. Each warm up can brew about 1-2 cups of coffee, depending on the amount of water you put. Like the bean dispenser, the Odea Go does not warn you when it is running low on water, only when it actually runs out. I get particularly annoyed when it brews my coffee then stops halfway because it has run out of water.

      The final compartment is for holding the coffee grinds and drips. This compartment is split into a taller portion, which holds the solid pucks of brewed ground coffee, and a drip tray, which is only an inch deep. I feel the design could be improved, since I always manage to spill the water in the drip tray, no matter how full or empty it is. Of the three compartments, this is the only one that has a warning light that actually goes off before everything spills out.

      Moving on to the more important things — the coffee! For the most part, the Saeco Odea Go makes good coffee, but this also depends on the quality of coffee beans you get. We have tried using different beans, some produce really bitter, acidic coffees, while others are perfectly fine. The coffee we finally stuck with is ...


      • a regular medium roast, and the Odea Go manages to brew beautiful espresso and coffee, always with nice crema on top. The dial in the middle of the machine allows you to control how much water will run through the grinds. I love this feature because when I want to cut back on my coffee intake, or just have “half a cup” in the afternoon, I can control how much coffee I make.

        The steam wand works relatively well. It only takes a few moments to heat up the water, but it is important you use a large container when steaming milk. I find there is quite a bit of water that shoots out with the steam, especially during the first few seconds. I don’t particularly like this because it makes your drink watered-down, but after a few seconds it gets better and milk froths nicely. The noise levels of the steam wand are pretty standard, nothing above normal. The wand also doubles as a hot water dispenser for teas.

        Maintenance of the machine is not too complicated. I am the only girl in the office, which means I have to be responsible for most of the stuff in the kitchen. It is important to wipe the machine down once in a while, so that coffee does not cake on. The drip tray also needs cleaning, as the coffee scum can get quite thick and hard to remove. That is really the only gross part about it. Descaling has to be done every few months (depending on the city you live in and the mineral-levels of the water), which is a big pain. Descaling solution for the Saeco machines are only available in a few stores – Murchies and Saeco stores.

        The process takes quite a while, because you have to run the solution through the steam wand then rinse it through a few times, but you can’t do this straight through because you risk overheating the machine. The entire descaling process took me over an hour, back and forth between the machine and my desk.

        I drink coffee from this machine everyday, so technically, I should not complain, but we paid almost $800.00 for it. The machine was purchased in October, and by February, it had stopped working. (I find this quite disappointing, especially since Saeco is a reputable brand and it cost so much!) Thankfully, it was still covered under warranty, so we got the repaired machine back in March and have been using it since then without any more break-downs. We were told that one of the rubber seals had melted from overuse, so they replaced it with a metal seal. Frankly, this makes me question why they didn’t use metal seals to begin with.

        The Odea Go makes good coffee, but make sure you buy good beans. Diligence in filling up the water and bean compartments will ensure a good cup of coffee. For $800.00 however, I expected more from it. I did not expect it to breakdown after three months of use, especially since less than ten people drink coffee from the machine. It is a good machine and has the ability to make good coffee, but it is definitely overpriced. If you have an extra $800.00 lying around and want a three-in-one coffee machine, this is the machine for you. But most people do not have that kind of money lying around and can get a machine that does the same things for half the price.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in August, 2010. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 5316081234040931/k2311a0816/8.16.10
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