The movie Remember the Titans (2000)
3.5
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  • As far as an actor goes I think that Denzel Washington is one of the best
  • Coach Yost is definitely at odds with Coach Boone's style
  • His strong feelings of right and wrong may cost him in the end, but he is a man of conscience
  • However that was really the only issue that I has with it
  • I really have to admit that I like this movie because it shows the times for what they were

    • by mandavalga
      TRUSTWORTHY

      all reviews
      As far as an actor goes I think that Denzel Washington is one of the best. It was with this in mind that I saw Remember the Titans.

      This movie is based on the true story of a Virginia football team that is forced to integrate in 1971. Due to the integration of the school - and the football team - Herman Boone (Denzel Washington) is named the head coach of the Titans at T.C. Williams High School. This job comes at the expense of the previous Coach, Bill Yost (Will Patton).

      Denzel Washington’s performance in this movie was great, but I really think Patton’s portrayal of Coach Yost is truly a shining moment. Patton is best known for supporting roles in the movies Armageddon, Gone is Sixty Seconds, and Entrapment. In Remember the Titans, we get to see the full


      scope of this actor’s talent. He conveys the conflict within Yost with great subtlety, yet we know it’s there.

      Coach Yost is definitely at odds with Coach Boone’s style. He does not want to be in this position (as it is essentially a demotion for him) but remains because the white players will refuse to play. He is putting what is best for his players above his own personal gains, and does this several times throughout the film. Coach Yost is a man caught in turbulent times. His strong feelings of right and wrong may cost him in the end, but he is a man of conscience.

      That is not to diminish Denzel Washington’s performance in the movie. Coach Boone has a job to do and a need to prove himself. The changes in the attitudes of the players was very well ...


      • done, and not rushed along for the sake of the story. Neither the black players nor the white players wish to associate with each other in the beginning. Coach Boone goes to extravagant lengths to force them to get to know one another. This is helped along by the fact that two white players from other areas of the country join the team - one from New Jersey and the other from California - where the attitudes are not quite as pro- separate as they are in Virginia.

        The only drawback I have to the entire film was the actual brutality involved in football itself. There are two scenes in particular that bothered me. One is where Coach Boone refuses to allow the players to get water during practice. In light of recent instances of players collapsing - and dying - after

        becoming dehydrated during practice, this was a little insensitive I thought. However that was really the only issue that I has with it.

        I really have to admit that I like this movie because it shows the times for what they were. It does not necessarily sugar coat things nor does it overly dramatize them. The movie tells the story for the way that it really was and makes this high school football team really come alive for the viewers.

        I love this movie and I own it. I will give it a 7 because of the fact that a few scenes were brutal. However there were some funny moments and a few tear jerkers. However it does a great job of telling a story that defies the odds and tells a story of over coming differences and about not judging someone based on their skin color.




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