Highway Patrol: Hot Dust TV Show  » TV  »
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  • Hot Dust, a third season episode from 1957, was quite interesting to watch
  • There's a youthful vulnerability there that I don't normally see in him, even in his other earlier work, so I was actually quite impressed with what he did in this half hour episode
  • A bit like the scene with Albert, some of this was forced in the writing and didn't make the best of sense

    • by Orrymain
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      Highway Patrol: Hot Dust, a third season episode from 1957, was quite interesting to watch. It concerned a young man named Harry Wells. He accidentally spills a container of radioactive material and then he panics. While he picks up the canister and places it in a secure location, Wells is too afraid to tell anyone, mainly because he doesn’t want to expose anyone else to the contamination.

      Wells falsely believes that anyone who touches him will get sick. He runs away, intending to die alone in the woods.

      Leonard


      Nimoy plays Wells and he does it very well. There’s a youthful vulnerability there that I don’t normally see in him, even in his other earlier work, so I was actually quite impressed with what he did in this half hour episode.

      Darlene Albert had a part of Well’s girlfriend, Fay, and did okay, although the segment was flawed. I don’t know why she was so desperate to see him and felt his lack of picking up the phone meant things were so dire. This is the only part ...


      • of the show that I really thought was forced.

        Patty Ann Gerrity portrayed a little girl who came into contact with Wells. Trying to protect her, he ends up knocking her doll’s head off and tossing it into the lake. That frightens her and sets off a bit of a violent manhunt. Gerrity did okay. A bit like the scene with Albert, some of this was forced in the writing and didn’t make the best of sense.

        Hot Dust was probably a public service show for this era.

        I imagine that anything radioactive was even more frightening in the 50’s than it is today. As such, the show did a good job of communicating what is dangerous, and not, and also how to deal with contaminated material.

        Again, Nimoy’s vulnerability here was terrific to watch. It’s something we don’t see often from him. I liked that he was a good person here. He didn’t mean any harm with anything he did. If anything, the show warns more against vigilante type of behavior than about Wells’ actions.




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