Doctor Who, Season Five on BBC America  » TV  »
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  • One last important fact about the Doctor - as a convenient way to write in the changes in actors that have portrayed him over time, any time the Doctor dies, he simply regenerates into a new physical form
  • For the most part, I enjoyed the plot lines in this season
  • I would definitely recommend it to anyone who enjoys a good science fiction series and doesn't mind a little fudging on the writing

    • by blunderkind
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      “Doctor Who” is a long-running science fiction series centering around “the Doctor,” an alien species known as a Time Lord with a surprisingly human-like appearance. The Doctor can travel through time and often ends up righting wrongs and setting events right when historic events change from their intended course. Traveling in his unique, blue police-box-shaped craft, the TARDIS, the Doctor sometimes makes these journeys alone while other times he takes along a companion - usually a human. One last important fact about the Doctor - as a convenient way to write in the changes in actors that have portrayed him over time, any time the Doctor dies, he simply “regenerates” into a new physical form.

      Season five of the recently-revived Doctor Who series centers around the eleventh incarnation of the Doctor, and his human companion Amy Pond, sometimes with her fiance in tow. This season is about cracks that appear in time, ready to swallow anything they can and send time as we know it into oblivion. Along the way, the Doctor encounters old enemies, like the robot-like supremacists known as the Daleks, and the creepy killer statues called the Angels (or the Weeping Angels). New species come along once in a rare while, but for the most part the series centers around human interactions and the fear that comes along with the cracks


      in time.

      I have been a fan of Doctor Who since I was a small child, so I was excited to see what would happen with this new incarnation of the Doctor, as played by Matt Smith. He takes a humorous approach to the Doctor’s mannerisms, often aloof and preferring to escape or make light of a situation than deal with it head-on (as the tenth Doctor would have done). It was a bit jarring at first, to have his personality be so different in comparison to previous seasons, but by a few episodes in I could appreciate this new approach.

      Smith does a wonderful job playing the “alien trying to blend in” type of role - as the Doctor he could almost be somebody’s slightly odd uncle, where he almost fits in the situation, but then makes a comment about being a classically trained French chef from 1812. Playing counter to the Doctor, the character Amy Pond is supposed to play a major role in the series. She is rumored to be as important as the Doctor, if not more so. Instead, she frequently takes a back seat role and while she is pivotal in the finale, there is no surprise or twist to her role. Likewise, her fiance Rory could have been mentioned off-screen and never shown and been just as important as ...


      • he already was. This is somewhat of a shame - what little we see of Rory is great. He is a hopeless romantic who cares deeply for Amy, and he brings some of the most emotional moments to the show.

        For the most part, I enjoyed the plot lines in this season. We get to meet Van Gogh, and we get terrified by the Angels once more. Sometimes the constant revival of already known species (like the Daleks and Angels) got repetitive, but this is typical practice for the series as a whole (just about every season has to feature the Daleks at least once, after all). This season is heavy on humor and has a stronger focus on humans and Earth than some previous seasons. I didn’t mind this - after all, the intended audience is human, so it is only fair that we get featured more often.

        The most frustrating thing with this season was the frequent “Deus ex Machina” type of solution. (Or perhaps Doctor ex Machina, to be exact, since the Doctor is the one who brings out the divine intervention.) Several episodes, and the season as a whole, conclude with the notion that because the Doctor does it in the future, he can go back in the past and do it again. Without spoiling the ending of

        the season, a basic example would be the Doctor is presented with an un-solvable puzzle. Then, when all seems lost, the Doctor from an hour in the future travels back to that very moment and tells himself how to solve it. The Doctor thus only knows how to solve it because he told himself, so an hour from that point he has to go back in time, and, well, tell himself how to solve the puzzle. So even though the puzzle was supposed to be impossible to solve, the Doctor can now solve it only because he has solved it in his future, which he has only done because his future self told him in the past. In previous seasons, the Doctor has referred to this paradox as “wibbly-wobbly, timey-wimey,” and there is a lot more wibbly-wobbly timey-wimey in this season than any other.

        Annoyingly predictable and dismissive writing aside, this was a wonderful season for anyone seeking an introduction to the series. It aired on BBC America here in the United States, and though the season is over, it is frequently showing as re-runs. I have re-watched the entire season several times, and find the replay value to be very high. I would definitely recommend it to anyone who enjoys a good science fiction series and doesn’t mind a little fudging on the writing.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in August, 2010. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 102081218350931/k2311a082/8.2.10
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