‘The Big Kahuna’ Australian Red Wine
3.0
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  • I think that there is a difference between the white wine drinker and the red
  • I found, when younger, that French ‘vin ordinaire’, or table wine, could be pretty rough stuff
  • Although I usually find red wines like this have a distinctive ‘nose’, in other words, a smell which characterises it and which can be indicative of the taste that has yet to come, I was rather disappointed by the ‘Big Kahuna’, as it seemed to have little to boast about in that department

    • by Anglecynn
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      I am a bit of a wine fan and I always like to try out the latest offering from my local wine merchant. I reserve the expensive Margaux and Nuits-Saint-Georges for special occasions, so I am not going to be writing about them right now. However, the more popular types of wine are worth looking at.

      A couple of decades ago or so, wine was still a fairly uncommon thing for people to drink in Britain. We were still a beer-swilling nation. Well, I suppose we still are. It’s just that we have added wine to that and we like a little something to drink with our meals, or for those evenings when we sit outside in the summer and talk about the week that has just passed, or the challenges of the one ahead. That is when we show something of ourselves.

      I think that there is a difference between the white wine drinker and the red. The white wine drinker has their wine cold and refreshing. It is usually


      lighter and less heady. The red drinker usually has a glass at room temperature and their poison is rather more prone to fuzzing up the head.

      I found, when younger, that French ‘vin ordinaire’, or table wine, could be pretty rough stuff. The Frenchman at work in the country would traditionally take a baguette loaf, a hunk of cheese and a bottle of wine for the day. The wine would be non-vintage and not that strong, but a bottle of it was still alcohol and it explains why so many French have liver disease.

      Since the 1980s, the British market has been receiving more and more wine from Down Under, both Australia and New Zealand. I remember it beginning with ‘Cloudy Bay’ and other excellent Kiwi white and then, it began to extend across the whole region and included reds. I dived into this market with enthusiasm, as I found French wines weren’t really what I was after. Spanish Rioja was fine, as was Italian wine. However, something about the very ...


      • tannic, full-bodied Aussie wines really hit the spot.

        It is in that vein that I tried a bottle of ‘Big Kahuna’ Australian red last night. Although I usually find red wines like this have a distinctive ‘nose’, in other words, a smell which characterises it and which can be indicative of the taste that has yet to come, I was rather disappointed by the ‘Big Kahuna’, as it seemed to have little to boast about in that department. I moved on to give it a chance to redeem itself by showing me its paces in its drinking. I was, admittedly, not drinking it in the heat of an Australian summer’s day, so I may be being a trifle unfair when its nose is considered, but I gave the taste a fair chance by swilling it around and allowing it to influence every area of my mouth and tongue. Here, I got tastes of a light, fruitiness, with a fresh taste, which is unusual in an Australian wine like this.

        Perhaps, this is because the actual grape variety or varieties are not mentioned anywhere. Normally, Australian wines will state whether they are Cabernet Sauvignon, or whatever, and the ‘Big Kahuna’ makes no mention at all. Odd. It is a light, south-eastern Australian wine and that lightness tends to be a characteristic of wines from that part of the country.

        After lots of gurgling and slurping, I had found some jammy flavours in this wine, so I won’t do it down. It has reasonable length (ie, its taste lingers after you have drunk it), but it isn’t excessive. There is even a hint of higher levels of alcohol here, as if there was a suggestion of something from a more distilled source within it, but that is only an observation, as I am sure it hasn’t! All told, then, a decent wine, but not a great one. It won’t wreak havoc with your head, if you drink a couple of glasses. Equally, however, it certainly isn’t a great, or a classic wine.




    0
    Pauline hogarth says :

    I have searched in vain to find bottles of The Big Kahuna red, to no avail. It was readily available from Tescos but seems to have disappeared from the shelves everywhere. Can anyone point me in the right direction to get some in for Christmas please. Many thanks

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    Anglecynn says :

    I found this online. I hope you have success in getting it

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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in July, 2010. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 2728071211131131/k2311a0728/7.28.10
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