Glenfarclas Whisky  » General  »
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  • I was most disappointed to find that the whisky aisle was spelled ‘Whiskey’, and in the land where whisky originated as well
  • They just said to the Customs men to try it and see whether they would consider drinking it
  • When I was a boy in my teens and early twenties, I tried this delicious whisky, but it was too strong for me
  • I think it needs a good measure of water, but cold, clean (preferably Scottish) water

    • by Anglecynn
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      I was in my local supermarket yesterday and was forced to complain. It had various items in different aisles, clearly identified. I was most disappointed to find that the whisky aisle was spelled ‘Whiskey’, and in the land where whisky originated as well. Dreadful.

      However, the main purpose of this article was to emphasis the fact that Scotch Whisky is the finest range of totally different whiskies in the world. That should not be taken to mean that other types of whisky are worse or inferior. Far from it. There are great whiskies in the USA and Ireland – even in France, for goodness sake! However, the widest range of types of whisky is to be found in Scotland. To illustrate my point, try a taste of Smith’s Glenlivet and then take a sip of Laphroaig and you may begin to catch my drift. People were able to import Laphroaig into the USA during Prohibition as a medicine! They just said to the Customs men to try it and see


      whether they would consider drinking it. They did and they didn’t, if you follow me! Apparently, it was imported right through that period, without any fuss.

      In that vein, take a little journey with me into that world of Scotch whiskies. They are all so different. Once upon a time, an attempt was made to make more of an island whisky by copying everything, including the ingredients and to make more of it. They didn’t succeed. In fact, each Scotch whisky is incapable of reproduction, which is sad, but which protects a vital part of the Scottish nation’s heritage. Now, they hope to reproduce whisky found in Antarctica that dates from before the First World War, because they have no records of what its ingredients were.

      One of the unique whiskies that may be a component of the Antarctic whisky is a single malt called ‘Glenfarclas’, which comes from Speyside in the north-east of Scotland. This is rich, agricultural land, interspersed with forests and high hills. Small towns and little villages ...


      • dot the countryside and the wide, slow river, the Spey, renowned for its fishing, meanders through the countryside, providing the water to distil this golden elixir.

        Glenfarclas is not a drink for youngsters. When I was a boy in my teens and early twenties, I tried this delicious whisky, but it was too strong for me. The distillers (a company owned by Grants) claim that a very small drop of water should be added to it to enjoy it fully and make the whisky ‘open up’ its flavours. I would disagree. I think it needs a good measure of water, but cold, clean (preferably Scottish) water. This will make the flavour more accessible, as the whisky itself may be too strong for some tastes. It has a spiciness that you could miss if you’re gasping at the shock of neat alcohol. When it is watered-down, it becomes more accessible and much more pleasant. It has a power that is only slightly mitigated by weakening. Its ‘nose’, or smell, is powerful

        and the length of the taste after you have savoured and swallowed it is a very long one. That is a sign a good whisky, when its flavour is still there several minutes after you have drunk it!

        This is a whisky that demands an accompaniment. I like a cigar when I drink whisky. When I drink a fine malt, or blended malt, like this one, I really like a cigar. In fact, odd though it may seem, it enhances the flavours of a good whisky as the smokiness that even Speyside whiskies possess react positively to the fullness of flavour of naturally-cured tobacco. Being stored in sherry casks may lend richness to the flavour of Glenfarclas too. As with most Scotch malts, it benefits from a complexity of flavours due to the involved interplay of water and grain, as well as the addition of the casks which all play their part in creating unique and widely differing tastes. That is the nature of all whiskies, especially those from Scotland.



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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in July, 2010. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 128071211121131/k2311a0728/7.28.10
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