Canon Selphy CP770 Compact Photo Printer  » Electronics  »
5.0
1 votes
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  • We spend most of the summer visiting a nearby beach and the printer is so convenient to lug around
  • But I believe it’s better to let the true resolution of the picture in its full 4 x 6 glory than downsizing since it changes the consistency of the pixels
  • But I think all of that is compensated by its easy interface
  • I definitely recommend photo printers especially this one because it’s an indispensable companion to your digital camera


    • by jhunie

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      This is our old photo printer back at home. I was among those individuals who embraced the idea of ready-to-print cams like the fun polaroids from the non-digitized film camera generation. Now printing quality photos is a cinch. Any novice who can print a basic document these days can do the same for pictures with their colored printers. But we decided in the family that it’s best to have a dedicated printer for still pictures. I remember a time when photo printers also became a trending gift of sorts. While a lot of the photos – byproducts of the digital frenzy are hosted on the internet as the receiving end virtually, I still love tangible photographs. I have my own portable printer too. I was relatively inspired to buy because of this device, a Canon Selphy CP770 compact photo printer.

      The printer is a standalone device so hooking it up to a computer is not necessary. The process of printing is a little weird, I suppose due to its linear set up. Unlike traditional printers whose front to back mechanism requires you to place the paper on the tray facing the front panel, you’ll have to load the paper on the back instead as the paper repeatedly passes through the print cartridge. Setting up


      all its peripherals doesn’t take much time as long as the print cartridge has been loaded on the right side of the printer and the power adapter is hooked. I must add though that the printer is wholly dependent on the power supply adapter since it’s not rechargeable, so that somewhat spoils its compact made-to-travel design. Printing via a digital cam needs a usb cable to synch them both, I don’t encounter compatibility problems because most of the cameras at home are canons. But whatever camera there is, it has a universal slot accepting various memory cards.

      It’s a sublimation printer which explains the strange overlaying of primary colors. The cartridge continually withdraws then runs through it again until the final print is made. The whole process is quite slow, almost spanning a minute between printing cycles but the manual says 52 seconds. Of course printing is limited on the amount of ink cartridge which also needs to be replenished periodically for 4 or 5 months depending on consumption. It lasts shorter than that sometimes and searching for the specific cartridge can be a difficult job. Most computer shops don’t sell this, thankfully my country has a dedicated Canon website where we can order it. The waterproof photo paper the printer comes with is also hard to ...


      • spot so we just subsist by getting the ordinary bookstore-variety photo paper.

        The design of the printer itself is much like child’s play in the form of what could be easily mistaken as a compact white bucket of lego. For that matter, the printer is such a huge contrast to serious laser inkjets or those photo printers that lack portability. The printer is fitted inside this plastic bucket complete with handles and fasteners at the side which locks its placement. I personally hate the messy jungles of cables and being oblivious to objects can be a hassle if you can’t find them, but the bucket serves as neat storage for all its peripherals or accessories. I can stack in there some spare photo papers, the manual and handy scissors for cutting profile pocket-sized prints on the fly. We spend most of the summer visiting a nearby beach and the printer is so convenient to lug around. You can just hitch it at the back of the car. Fortunately, an immediate power source is always present in the cottage.

        Customization is possible with this printer, I really like the color options like the sepia tones and black and white prints. That way, I’m able to make 3 variations of a single picture. The sepia toning changes the multicolored quality

        of a photo into a muddy neutral tone, an instant vintage picture if you like. If I feel like flattening out the colors completely and create a frame-worthy photograph, then I choose to print it in monotonous black and white. You can also set up borders for a framed finish to your photographs. But I believe it’s better to let the true resolution of the picture in its full 4 x 6 glory than downsizing since it changes the consistency of the pixels.

        I don’t see an existing technical flaw on the device, other than the heat emanating from its dye-sublimation printing which involves heating in the process. But I note that the device seems to stutter if opted to print at a continuous pace. Another minor flaw is the manual selection as the device cannot be operated whilst it’s printing, you have to wait for the process to be done and then choose another picture. You can’t queue them up either, except if you’re consolidating many photos in a single picture at a smaller size as well as printing photos in multiple copies. But I think all of that is compensated by its easy interface.

        At 90 dollars it’s quite affordable. I definitely recommend photo printers especially this one because it’s an indispensable companion to your digital camera.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in July, 2010. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 1626071208960131/k2311a0726/7.26.10
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