Banjo-Tooie  » Games  »
4.5
1 votes
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  • I was very excited when this game was released because I had enjoyed Banjo-Kazooie quite a lot for its platforming challenges, puzzle elements, fun characters, whimsical and lively soundtrack and overall wacky and sometimes gross humor
  • When I started playing this game, I was, first of all, very impressed with the nearly fifteen minute opening
  • It makes me wonder why Rare didn't make use of the Expansion Pack that grants the Nintendo 64 additional memory because I think that might have helped with the choppiness
  • This was really clever and I love how the worlds connect with one another in a such a way that if I come across a character that needs something in one level, I can travel to another level and seek out what he or she needs and bring that something or somethings back
  • Unfortunately, while the original game played without any slow down or choppiness, the slowdown and choppiness in this game is evident on several occasions and that hampers the gameplay, and at times, the worlds are too big for their own good, and thus it can be frustrating and confusing because it's easy to get lost or not really know what I should do next


    • by CirclingCanvas

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      Banjo-Tooie is a Nintendo 64 video game that’s also the sequel to Banjo-Kazooie. I was very excited when this game was released because I had enjoyed Banjo-Kazooie quite a lot for its platforming challenges, puzzle elements, fun characters, whimsical and lively soundtrack and overall wacky and sometimes gross humor. When I started playing this game, I was, first of all, very impressed with the nearly fifteen minute opening! The long opening really set the stage for the game’s story and in it, there was the familiar humor from the previous humor, as well as music that was at times eerie, other times comical and pretty intense when the scene called for it. The developer, Rare, really knew how to enhance a scene with the right kind of music. I was very impressed with the extended opening, and I continued to be impressed when I visited the first world of the game, and even very much overwhelmed. The worlds in Banjo-Tooie make the worlds in the previous game seem small, and that’s because they’re huge! They’re so large that they’re downright intimidating because there’s so much to do, so much ground to cover, and quite frankly, it’s easy to get lost at

      times. There are even mini-warps in every world because the worlds are just so expansive. There is a drawback to these really large and beautifully detailed worlds: slow down.

      It’s pretty obvious that this game really pushes the Nintendo 64’s hardware to its upper limits. Even in the very first world, there is, at times, choppiness and the framerate drops because there is just so much the Nintendo 64 has to render and display on the screen. It makes me wonder why Rare didn’t make use of the Expansion Pack that grants the Nintendo 64 additional memory because I think that might have helped with the choppiness. If the first world is almost too much for the Nintendo 64 to handle, then just imagine how large and detailed the later worlds are! This game is, quite honestly, huge and it will take many hours to fully explore every corner of just one level. What I also love about these massive levels is that they’re connected with each other. A train runs through the levels and the overworld and many times, I’ll need to use the train to transport something from one level to another, or I’ll need to carry something from one level to another. This was really clever and I love how the worlds connect with one another in a such a way that if I come across a character that needs something in one level, I can travel to another level and seek out what he or she needs and bring that something or somethings back. This game definitely requires more work and more backtracking than the previous game, and sometimes, the solution to a problem within a world takes some definite thinking for an extended period of time, and as I said, it can be overwhelming at times.

      With large new worlds and at times complex challenges, comes new moves for Banjo and Kazooie. I feel this game did a great job expanding the attacks and abilities of both characters, and I’m particularly pleased with the introduction of the split up pads where I can actually separate Banjo and Kazooie and control just one character. Some tasks require both characters to be together, others require I take just one for the task and other challenges require that I repeatedly switch between characters to accomplish a task. This added a new dimension to the gameplay and again, made the game more ...


      • Banjo-Tooie
      challenging than the previous game overall since the objectives that needed to be accomplished generally contained more steps and more work. The game pushes me to explore an area, and through that exploration discover something that needs to be done and then leaves me to figure out how to go about doing that something, be it through splitting up Banjo and Kazooie and taking them to different areas in the world to perform individual tasks or travel back and forth between worlds and with items in tow.

      What this game also did better than the original was that it feature more boss fights and the boss fights offered a definite challenge, generally. Not only that, but the boss fights were unique in that I had to go about a different way of defeating each, be it by using a certain kind of egg or fight the boss while flying or while under water, and so on. The game also expanded the number of in-game mini-games, featured first-person shooter type levels that involved mazes, and offered four-player multiplayer as well as an option to replay any boss battle, any mini-game of any cinema clip that I’ve already played through or seen at

      any time! These are all vast improvements over what was done in the original. Unfortunately, while the original game played without any slow down or choppiness, the slowdown and choppiness in this game is evident on several occasions and that hampers the gameplay, and at times, the worlds are too big for their own good, and thus it can be frustrating and confusing because it’s easy to get lost or not really know what I should do next. There is also the fact that the Gruntilda character lost some of her charm since she didn’t rhyme her sentences for most of the game like she did in the first game and the music in this game wasn’t quite as vibrant or intricately composed and didn’t draw me into the worlds and cinema scenes as well as the soundtrack in the first game.

      Despite the game’s flaws, Banjo-Tooie is a game that provides challenge after challenge in breathtaking worlds and is lots of fun to play through. Beating the game gives me such a sense of satisfaction and accomplishment. The game never gets stale because many of the challenges are unique and utilize all of Banjo and Kazooie’s abilities pretty well. This game definitely deserves a “9″ rating!




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The review was published as it's written by reviewer in June, 2010. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 2829061165810930/k2311a0629/6.29.10
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