“The Hunger Games” by Suzanne Collins
2.5
1 votes
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  • The book is definitely a light and pleasant read - especially for its subject matter
  • I was fascinated by the society and customs, and enjoyed finding out more about Districts and the Games themselves
  • Moreover, I think it commendable that the question concerned itself with the problems of oppression
  • I would recommend it to teens and adults who feel like a light reading, perhaps for the summer

    • by Rachel Evans
      TRUSTWORTHY

      all reviews
      I checked it out from sheer curiosity - it’s good to be up to date with the upcoming fad, I suppose (although I didn’t manage to force myself through the Twilight books). The book is definitely a light and pleasant read - especially for its subject matter.

      The story is not very complicated, and the plot twists are all hailed well in advance (admittedly, this might merely mean that foreshadowing is working and I expect too much from a young adult book). The


      heroine is courageous and we’re inclined to like her for the sacrifice she is willing to undergo for the sake of her younger sister (a ploy that truly works, I have to admit). She lives in a occupied country so to speak, oppressed by the Capitol, a system which grew out of the ashes of the long-deceased United States; therefore, the book can be considered science fiction or a post-apocalyptic dystopia. She participates in the eponymous Hunger Games - a Big Brother or Survivor combined with the Minotaur myth, with a dash of Orson Scott Card’s Ender’s Game thrown in for a good measure. It’s teens-killing-teens sort of world, all for survival (and for the masses’ entertainment).

      The world-building, while at times quite obvious and predictable, is definitely the strongest part of the novel. I was fascinated by the society and customs, and enjoyed finding out more about Districts and the Games themselves. However, the characters were at times unconvincing, and the main plot lacked ...


      consistent pacing or an actual surprise - I predicted half of the plot.

      However, while I have my doubts concerning characterisation, I have to say that it was a pleasure to read a novel with a strong female protagonist who knows what she wants and is willing to do questionable things to get it - and who is not condemned for it, because the circumstances are truly dire. Moreover, I think it commendable that the question concerned itself with the problems of oppression.

      I’m also curious whether the heroine could be read as non-white - while her mother and sister are certainly coded as white-skinned blondes, her father and Katniss herself are both described as olive-skinned and dark-haired, as majority of the poor, Appalachia-dwelling population in the book.

      I enjoyed the book enough to check out the sequel; however, the style could definitely use some improvement and more subtlety. I would recommend it to teens and adults who feel like a light reading, perhaps for the summer.




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The review was published as it's written by reviewer in June, 2010. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 1725061158750130/k2311a0625/6.25.10
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