Ozark Oak Natural Lump Hardwood Charcoal For Grilling  » Housewares  »
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  • To that end, novice grillers (and even those with some experience) don’t always know what to look for in charcoal, and what to avoid
  • As we do so, keep in mind that the barbecue guru with the custom grill uses hardwood logs, as do some of the best BBQ dives you’ll find
  • I’d recommend a chimney starter for these as well, and if you can’t find real charwood, then get natural briquettes
  • An interesting note about food grade paraffin

    • by GAVD
      TRUSTWORTHY

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      When it comes to healthy food, the fuel you use to grill your food is just as important as the food you plan to grill. To that end, novice grillers (and even those with some experience) don’t always know what to look for in charcoal, and what to avoid. So here’s a quick primer about coals for those who want to enter into the world of grilling. As we do so, keep in mind that the barbecue guru with the custom grill uses hardwood logs, as do some of the best BBQ dives you’ll find. Since logs don’t fit in the average grill, we’ll have to leave that topic be!

      The first type of coal, which is the type preferred by serious grillers and found in good restaurants that grill food, is known as lump or charwood coal. Charwood coal is made by burning whole logs or large pieces of wood in a type of oxygen controlled oven. The result is wood coal, which so many novices have a hard time lighting (you want to use what is called a chimney starter to do so and not matches and lighter fluid, which will take forever if it even works). The reason why


      restaurants and serious grillers—me included—like charwood is because it burns hot and at a fairly even temperature, and it burns for a very long time with little to no ash left behind.

      The second type of coal is known as ‘natural briquettes’. These are in fact smaller chunks of charwood coal held together by some type of natural filler, such as starch. They aren’t as good as charwood, and they don’t burn evenly hot, but they last a good while and are somewhat easier to light. I’d recommend a chimney starter for these as well, and if you can’t find real charwood, then get natural briquettes.

      The last type is the infamous charcoal briquette. This is the one that is easy to light and use, and produces a lot of ash and doesn’t burn long—for good reasons. Generally, charcoal briquettes are made from wood scraps and coal dust, and held together by paraffin and other petroleum products. Because of this, I don’t use or recommend charcoal briquettes, no matter how famous or well-established the manufacturer. Here are some of the other reasons why I won’t use them, other than the fact that petroleum is poisonous to human beings—especially when ingested. An interesting ...


      • note about food grade paraffin: it’s the same stuff they coat apples with, which you need to remove before consumption since its bad for you—it limits the amount of water removed from the stool. And another note about liquid paraffin used in medicine: it’s used to induce bowel movements. Taken together, now you know why the last time you went to a grilling party or barbecue and suffered a Greek tragedy when going for you morning glory—you may have wanted (even needed) to go, but you couldn’t. That’s what I call irony, and it’s also why I don’t use charcoal briquettes. And neither should you.

        That said, the novice griller should start out with a basic charwood, like Ozark Oak Natural Lump Hardwood Charcoal. This is what I use when I want to grill and not get exotic with different flavors (mesquite, apple, etc.).

        First of all, a bag of Ozark Oak Natural Lump Hardwood Charcoal is not that expensive; you can pick up a 10-pound bad for under $10 (I’ve even gotten bags of it for under $5). Plus, the lumps are fairly big, being made from what appears to be oak and hickory—two types of log preferred by grillers because

        they burn for a very long time at high temperatures. Plus, there’s little dust or chips in the bag.

        With my trusty chimney starter, Ozark Oak Natural Lump Hardwood Charcoal is easy to light. In the grill, it burns evenly and very hot for quite some time—I can usually cook up several steaks, a bunch of hot dogs and burgers, and grill up some veggies as well, and still have enough coal left to put a pot or skillet on the grill to add whatever else to the menu with one chimney full of coal. Plus, the coal gives off a light smokey smell, which finds its way into the food for a lightly smoked taste. Best of all, it leaves little ash behind, making for easy cleanup.

        These are the reason why I would recommend Ozark Oak Natural Lump Hardwood Charcoal to the novice charwood griller. I use it all the time, and never once have I had any complaints!

        Pros: Easy to light with a chimney starter Generous sized coal lumps Burns hot and for good duration Leaves little ash behind Natural ingredients Cooks great tasting food with a slight smoke taste

        Cons: Can be hard to find outside of Amazon or NexTag Nearly impossible to light without a chimney starter The bags could be bigger




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