Cowboy Hardwood Lump Charcoal For Grilling
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  • Personally, I think grillers all over the world should unite and boycott the Cowboy brand, which also, also produces the lump charcoal marketed as Whole Foods and Williams Sonoma
  • But what I can say is I know what glue and other chemicals that go into pressboard, plywood, and treated lumber smells like when it’s burning and for a moment I did get a whiff of that scent as the grill heated up
  • For the sake of family and friends, and even though I can’t prove one way or the other what those hardwood coal lumps are made of, I’d never recommend Cowboy products of any kind to anyone—especially Cowboy Hardwood Lump Charcoal

    • by GAVD
      TRUSTWORTHY

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      If there’s anything that would actually make me use regular charcoal briquettes and lighter fluid over real hardwood charcoal, it’s Cowboy Hardwood Lump Charcoal. Personally, I think grillers all over the world should unite and boycott the Cowboy brand, which also, also produces the lump charcoal marketed as Whole Foods and Williams Sonoma.

      What set me off about this stuff? It’s not the fact that the bag is full of chips and dust (which good hardwood coal really doesn’t have), and that it sparks and produces low heat and a ton of ash during use (which good hardwood lump charcoal doesn’t do). And it’s not the fact that it doesn’t burn any longer than the average briquette, which isn’t for very long—good lump charcoal burns steady and hot, for a long time. But I won’t pretend that this is


      the main reason for my dislike for the Cowboy brand, even though this is more than enough, not to mention that it took a while to get the residue out of the bottom of my grill.

      I don’t like this brand because of the content. Cowboy Hardwood Lump appears to be nothing more than scrap wood taken from the floors at mills and constructions sites. Now, I surely can’t prove that the coals were really wood scraps. But if it burns like it, looks like (they were all fairly small chunks, which is not ordinary of hardwood coal), and smells like it as it burns, then it must be as far as I’m concerned.

      If this is true, then one has to wonder how it was ever approved for human consumption. Further, there have been reports from buyers who state they have ...


      • found nails and glue in Cowboy Hardwood Lump Charcoal—I can’t comment on the veracity of these claims since I didn’t see anything like that. But what I can say is I know what glue and other chemicals that go into pressboard, plywood, and treated lumber smells like when it’s burning and for a moment I did get a whiff of that scent as the grill heated up. Needless to say, I didn’t cook on the grill and instead let the coals burn out and that’s when I discovered the residue under the mountain of ash at the bottom of my grill.

        I was really disturbed by what could have gone into the meats and vegetables I was about to cook my wife and kids through the medium of heat and smoke; it doesn’t take a genius to understand that glues, resins, paints and

        primers along with chemical treatments for waterproofing and more are not meant for human consumption, even after the wood they have been applied to has been burned to produce coal—contrary to popular belief, they don’t dissipate due to heat and fire. And yet these very chemicals are what would have been released around and penetrated the foods through the mediums of heat, vapor and smoke if I’d have walked away from the grill and not caught a whiff of what was going on under the hood.

        For the sake of family and friends, and even though I can’t prove one way or the other what those hardwood coal lumps are made of, I’d never recommend Cowboy products of any kind to anyone—especially Cowboy Hardwood Lump Charcoal.

        Pros: Cheap—and that isn’t saying much

        Cons: Chemical smell Possibly contaminants in the coal, which could be a severe health hazard Produces far too much ash




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in June, 2010. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 5321061151660730/k2311a0621/6.21.10
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