Three Barrels French Brandy
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  • Although there are many inventions which have been attributed to other peoples, there is no doubt that the conversion of wine into something even more interesting, probably belongs to the Gallic race
  • Unfortunately, the world is not filled with fine brandies, or even with fine cognacs

    • by Anglecynn
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      One of the first drinks that could be termed ‘spirits’ in present-day terms was ‘cognac’. Now the French lay claim to many inventions and they have every right to do so. The first moving film was made by a Frenchman (strangely enough, it was filmed in a front garden in a city in the north of England) and the first photograph was made by a Frenchman too, many years before anyone else, French or otherwise did so.

      The French are a wonderful race. They are friendly and they are wonderful at many things. They have a well-deserved reputation for their culinary skills and I, for one, am happy to endorse their ability to make something that would be bland, if produced by another race, but which is sublime in the hands of a Frenchman.

      Although there are many inventions which have been attributed to other peoples, there is no doubt that the conversion of wine into something even more interesting, probably belongs to the Gallic race. I have travelled through many countries


      and I have drunk what other countries have the audacity to call ‘brandy’. Now ‘brandy’ is more the word that a coarse, English-speaker like myself would call a drink which is distilled from wine. In many countries, this is a well-regarded local product which is sold to foreigners as something characteristic of their nation and something to be sought after.

      I certainly do not wish to make other nationalities cross by condemning their local brandy, but I have to be completely honest and say that no one else’s brandy tastes anything like as good as cognac. Full stop. I have been to Germany, Greece, Italy and Spain. Their brandies are different from French brandy, but they are not superior. Just as French cuisine differs from German or Italian, their spirits do also.

      I would wish to be quite specific in this report, as there are several French cognacs and each as its own strengths and weaknesses. In terms of ‘Three Barrels’ French cognac, I should point out that it is a cognac ...


      • at the cheaper end of the scale. Does this make it unworthy of being drunk? In short, no. Offer the average drinker a choice between Greek brandy and French and I would dare to say that the general opinion would be to opt for the French. I say that in full realization of my utter adoration of Greece. French cognac is a drink which fills the senses and satisfies the demands of philosophers. In Greece, raki performs that admirable task.

        When I drink ‘Three Barrels’ brandy (cognac, if you prefer), I find that I am consuming a very powerful spirit, yet it is one that brooks no addition of any lengthening soft drink. I would defy anyone to add something to a pure cognac! Even so, this is a drink which requires nurturing. You must warm it in your hands to allow the aroma to escape. It expands the flavour of the drink and gives it a ‘nose’ that is sadly lacking in the other brandies with which it competes. It

        is a cheap (or, as the French would say, ‘bon marche’) cognac which would have very little value in a world filled with brandies of great value. Unfortunately, the world is not filled with fine brandies, or even with fine cognacs. This is one that meets the main demands of most drinkers, however. It has a powerful taste and a good, fragrant ‘nose’, as a good French wine has, equally. It is a strong drink, so it should not be regarded as some cheap booze. It is a wonderful addition to many French dishes such as Lamb cooked in Garlic & Brandy (exquisite), even though it may not be the absolute height of French expertise in the manufacture of brandy. It is still one heck of a good drink and worthy of being lined up beside the mass of bourbons, Irish whiskies and even Scotches. I would say that this is a worthy drink to be called ‘brandy’ and it should be well-regarded by anyone except the most profound brandy (or cognac) snob!




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in June, 2010. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 2718061149071230/k2311a0618/6.18.10
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