Supplies Telesales Job - Intuit, Inc. (call-center)
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  • Call-center work can be tedious and frustrating, as anyone with call-center experience knows
  • Within a few months, I learned how inconsistent working at Intuit could be
  • But once it became clear fewer businesses were willing to pay a premium for Intuit checks (there are far cheaper places to buy the same check stock, so Intuit relies largely on brand recognition and buyer loyalty), cost cutting became widely employed
  • After another month of constant e-mails, messages, and meetings where my supervisor tried to pressure me into quitting, I decided I had enough
  • The day I left that building was definitely the happiest day I spent at Intuit, and thankfully the last day

    • by blunderkind
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      Call-center work can be tedious and frustrating, as anyone with call-center experience knows. It can also be engaging and the pay and bonuses tend to compensate for the more frustrating customers. With experience in call-centers elsewhere, I went to Intuit knowing I would have a broad spectrum of calls to handle, and I felt prepared for the experience. In my interview, the recruiter explained to me that I would be selling paper supplies such as envelopes, check stock, and deposit slips, that were supported by Intuit’s financial programs such as QuickBooks and Quicken. My primary customer would be a small business owner, with some personal users coming up on occasion. According to the recruiter, there “might be rare occasions” where I would need to cross-sell software or a service, such as payroll services or technical support, but my focus would be supplies.

      Training was a single month. They tried to keep it varied by partially training us on a system, then completely changing topics to a lesson on taxes and liabilities. Often this made training difficult to retain since we would forget that half-learned information in favor of some new thing, never quite getting mastery of a topic. Then we would sit in the call-center for a few hours, listening to live calls next to a sales agent, with no idea what they were talking about. The scheduling for training was poorly laid out, with several long gaps in the day most of


      us spent playing around on the internet, due to lack of training materials.

      At the end of our month, we were tossed out to the sales floor, with the promise that we would be closely watched and helped out. Few of us ever saw help and whenever we needed assistance, it became a matter of putting the customer on hold, then making them wait several minutes while we tried to find help. Eventually we were split up and moved to our new sections.

      At this point, I was still excited about the prospect of a high bonus. The recruiter explained that while the base pay was low compared to most jobs (lower than the average Taco Bell employee makes), the bonus meant even the lowest performers made an extra $7000 a year, and the top performers could make $30K and up. I figured as a new employee, I would probably start low and move up. But I quickly realized that the recruiter had left out the fact that the bonus would be slashed if your performance was not at a certain percentage - she made it sound like the minimum payout at the end of the month would be almost $600, then it was adjusted upwards as you exceeded the goal. I shrugged this off as a misunderstanding and accepted my lower paychecks as a new reason to set a stricter budget for myself.

      Within a few months, I learned how inconsistent working at Intuit could be.


      • One week, a particular practice (such as offering a discount on software for renewing customers) was expected, while the next, without warning, it was cause to get pulled off the phone and lectured by the same person who had encouraged it. (There was no expiration date on a discount like this, so there was no apparent reason for the sudden reprimand.) The coaches at Intuit are quick to insist that the goal of a salesperson is to find their own wording and to be comfortable with what they sell. However, almost daily employees receive e-mails with “word tracks” they are expected to follow. It was common for a coach to send one e-mail reminding employees “You aren’t scripted here, so don’t sound scripted when you talk on the phones!” and then follow it up with “I need you to follow this particular word track when trying to sell payroll. I will be listening to your calls to make sure you use it.”

        Still, even with the inconsistencies, and with the fact that the very goals employees get their bonus based on aren’t sent to those employees until the sales month is halfway over, I was fairly happy with my job. But once it became clear fewer businesses were willing to pay a premium for Intuit checks (there are far cheaper places to buy the same check stock, so Intuit relies largely on brand recognition and buyer loyalty), cost cutting became widely employed. After my supervisor

        was pressured into firing a long-time employee, the very manager that had pushed for her termination fired him as well. My new supervisor immediately began sending me reminders that I was “at will employed” and could be terminated at any time if I was not performing to his particular goals.

        After another month of constant e-mails, messages, and meetings where my supervisor tried to pressure me into quitting, I decided I had enough. Hearing every day that you are going to lose your job can be a very stressful experience, and I had started getting sick from worrying about it. I finally gave in to my supervisor’s pressure and quit. The day I left that building was definitely the happiest day I spent at Intuit, and thankfully the last day.

        For someone who is okay with high-pressure, scripted sales, they can go far at Intuit. I don’t mean to dissuade people who are naturally salespeople and who have the tolerance to handle the situations I was in (they seem to be a common experience), as some people truly do make a lot of money through the bonus structure at Intuit. But if you are a casual, or even meek, person who is looking for a job in a pleasant environment, you may want to talk to a few other Intuit employees, present and former, before making the decision to take the job. I truly wish I had, rather than waste nearly a year of sleepless nights and terrible pay.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in June, 2010. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 617061146630230/k2311a0617/6.17.10
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