The Ray Bradbury Theater: And the Moon Be Still as Bright TV Show  » TV  »
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  • Maybe it was his interpretation, but in my opinion, it was a let down
  • I was much more impressed with Kenneth Welsh, who played Captain Wilder
  • There is a surprising ending that follows the best part of the show, which was a discussion between Spender and Wilder where they talk about what's happening

    • by Orrymain
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      From October 1990, The Ray Bradbury Theater: And the Moon Be Still as Bright guest stars David Carradine as an archaeologist named Spender who is part of an expedition to Mars. This is actually the third crew to reach the planet.

      As part of the team searches the area, they find a place that looks to have leaves spread all around, only when they do a proper analytical review of the leaf-like object, it turns out that the leaves aren’t leaves but are ashes, the remains of an extinct race that died


      of chicken pox brought to the planet by the earthlings in the prior two previous landings on Mars.

      This story really takes on an odd turn. Now some might say that Spender went insane, but others might make the argument that he was possessed. This is because the world changed for him after he took a close look at what looks like a bronze image of a Martian.

      Carradine surprised me in this role because he seemed to be sleeping through the part. I felt like I was watching Kung Fu ...


      • on Mars. His vocal delivery was like his Caine character in Kung Fu, or as if he couldn’t get his breath. It was broken and paused in method, and it annoyed me. I didn’t see layers in his portrayal. The man was a gifted actor from a great acting family, but I didn’t see that here. Maybe it was his interpretation, but in my opinion, it was a let down.

        I was much more impressed with Kenneth Welsh, who played Captain Wilder. He did show some depth

        to his character.

        The rest of the guest cast was very average in my opinion, with the possible exception of James Purcell, whose Parkhill character was a bit of a maverick. He had me wondering how a man like Parkhill could ever survive in a military structure. He’s always questioning his orders and even disobeying.

        There is a surprising ending that follows the best part of the show, which was a discussion between Spender and Wilder where they talk about what’s happening. That was good; the rest wasn’t all that appealing.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in June, 2010. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 1011061139480930/k2311a0611/6.11.10
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