The Ray Bradbury Theater: The Wind TV Show
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    • by Orrymain
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      From season three, airing in July 1989, The Ray Bradbury Theater: The Wind was one that I had a hard time focusing on and getting into. It was slow and somewhat boring. What is odd to me is that the topic should have had more punch throughout the entire half hour.

      The story surrounds a weather guru, John Colt as played by Michael Sarrazin, who finds


      himself being chased by the wind. That’s what he says; hence, the title of this Bradbury outing.

      What we get a lot of in this show is howling wind. It goes from being quiet to wind being heard everywhere. It’s quite annoying as a viewer. It’s hard to do a story about something like this without frustrating listeners. We’re not talking a peaceful ...


      • blowing in the wind, but a loud, violent noise.

        The Wind is another one of Bradbury’s tales that seems a little pointless, or perhaps it’s just that it’s confusing. Is this the wind getting revenge on a storm chaser? Is that what it thinks of John Colt? He seems to think the wind wants him to become a part of it.

        I’m not sure how this

        ends, if it’s a suicide, a murder, or some kind of unification between a phenomenon of nature and human being. It’s weird, it’s disturbing, and I don’t see the point. What I am is grateful when it’s all over.

        Ray Henwood and Vivienne Labone also appear in this show. Henwood actually gets the last confusing scene with the wind that sounds much like Colt.

        My advice — skip it.




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