The Ray Bradbury Theater: To the Chicago Abyss TV Show
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  • In fact, I've noticed that one of my issues with several of these Ray Bradbury science fiction stories is that I'm having to do too much guessing about where the story occurs and when it happens
  • At issue, at least in part, is that he is talking about oranges and limes, which isn't a smart idea
  • The very last moment was the best, when the old man meets a little boy

    • by Orrymain
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      From 1989, The Ray Bradbury Theater: To the Chicago Abyss concerns some future era when times are tough and food is precious. In fact, apparently very few are left who remember how life used to be, when everyone could go where they wanted and each fruits and vegetables.

      I don’t believe they did a really good setup for this drama. In fact, I’ve noticed that one of my issues with several of


      these Ray Bradbury science fiction stories is that I’m having to do too much guessing about where the story occurs and when it happens. It’s like I’m thrown into the middle of the action, but I’m not being told the scenario. I’m only getting half of the environment that I need to really know what’s going on.

      To the Chicago Abyss opens with an old man getting into a fight with another ...


      • man. At issue, at least in part, is that he is talking about oranges and limes, which isn’t a smart idea. Played by Harold Gould, this old man, which is the only way he’s referred to in the story, is wanted by the police. He’s taken in, though, and protected by a couple who want but one thing of him — to remember.

        As if he were an actor, the couple

        and their friends are desperate just to hear his memories of a time before. It’s fascinating. Between this scene and the mention of another place where the old man is told to go, it reminded me a little of a cross between Sol in Soylent Green and the book people of Farenheit 451.

        All in all, this was interesting. The very last moment was the best, when the old man meets a little boy.




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