Forbidden Brides of the Faceless Slaves in the Secret House of the Night of Dread Desire by Neil Gaiman  » Books  »
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  • When I was reading this, it seemed at first like a horror story, or one of those creepy and gothic stories (very Neil Gaiman)

    • by Katherine Rose
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      This long-titled short story is from Neil Gaiman. I read it in his collection of short stories and poems, Fragile Things. The story is written in split-style. Normal font for one part, bold font for the “fiction” being written by the character written in normal font. When I was reading this, it seemed at first like a horror story, or one of those creepy and gothic stories (very Neil Gaiman). The writer

      is frustrated and cannot enjoy very much the whole writing process, as he focuses on slice of life types of writing. The woman, Amelia Earnshawe, as the writer tells, is running through the wood, fleeing from an evil coachman due to unfortunate events. She ends up at the front door of an ancient looking house which turns out to be her inheritance. Weird. Even weirder is the way the equally ancient doorman expires right before her eyes and rots and starts to putrefy. Meanwhile, the writer has trouble, and his raven starts talking to him. Eyes in the portrait stare at him and some senile aunt needs feeding. Amelia is ordered by ghost slaves to look for their brides, and the butler of the writer gets mad at something. Then the writer has a duel with his long lost brother, kills him, and has a change of ...

      • Forbidden Brides of the Faceless Slaves in the Secret House of the Night of Dread Desire by Neil Gaiman
      heart about his writing. Huh. Then Amelia is transported into another world, wherein she hates her husband. Then the butler makes a girl named Ethel swear to secrecy.

      I don’t understand! It’s science fiction and weirdness all in one. Amelia has no real ending, it’s slice of life like the writer originally wants to write. No mention of the ancient looking doorman again, or of the ancient looking house. What. In the end I wasn’t

      sure if I just wasted my time, or if an important piece of literature was lost on me. This story supposedly won 2005 Best Story of Locus Awards. Why then do I not think this was such a great story, that it even merited a Best Story award?

      7 points for being initially interesting, with Amelia running into the house from the woods. No points for shifting gear towards the end of the story, with no climax at all.




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The review was published as it's written by reviewer in June, 2010. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 175061129040430/k2311a065/6.5.10
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