New Super Mario Bros. Wii
3.5
1 votes
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  • Unfortunately, that's all that this game really has going for it
  • The adventure could have and I think should have been longer
  • Still though, I had fun playing through the game and so I believe it to be deserving of a 7 rating


    • by CirclingCanvas

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      “New Super Mario Bros. Wii” is a two-dimensional side scrolling video game for the Nintendo Wii. It’s very similar to the Mario games that were released on the Nintendo Entertainment System, Super Nintendo Entertainment System, the Game Boy and Game Boy Advance portables as well as the “New Super Mario Bros.” game for the Nintendo DS portable. It essentially then returns Mario to his roots while at the same time adds some new concepts that weren’t possible on the previous systems and portables, with the exception of the Nintendo DS, like, for example, having platforms that tilt horizontally to the left or right when I tilt the Wii controller downward left or downward right. Also, the game has platforms that move to the right or left along a track depending on the direction I tilt the Wii controller. These are physics that the previous systems and two of the three portables couldn’t handle, but really, in my eyes, these concepts don’t dramatically advance the gameplay. The Wii is also capable of handling large, moving objects that require me to be able to keep my character on top of as the object is constantly turning, and if I don’t stay on the top, my character will slip off and lose a life. This is a mildly challenging concept that previous systems and the two portables couldn’t pull off.

      There


      are some other gameplay elements in this side scrolling game that the previous aforementioned consoles and two portables couldn’t pull off, like the penguin suit power-up which I can use to have my character slide across icy terrain at great speeds. Then there’s the rolling landscape. On some levels, a portion or more of the landscape will turn like a gear, and sometimes, as its turning, it will eventually reveal an opening with something , like a pipe. Then in some dessert levels, a strong gust blows, forcing me to work against or with the wind gusts. Also in some dessert levels, there’s “sand geysers” that briefly shoot up and I have to jump on and off of to traverse a portion of the level. This is all stuff previous two-dimensional Mario side scrolling games couldn’t pull off, with the exception of the DS game. The game does benefit from these concepts and it does help this two-dimensional Mario game feel fresh and indeed “new” compared to previous two-dimensional Mario games, with the exception of the DS game, which employed some similar ideas and had powerful enough hardware to pull off these concepts.

      Unfortunately, that’s all that this game really has going for it. The levels, regardless of how far into the game I got, seemed almost as short as the levels in previous two-dimensional Mario games. I ...


      • expected the levels to be longer because of the much larger capacity of a Wii disc as apposed to a game cartridge. Not only that, but there’s just nine worlds total, and most worlds have about ten levels or so. That’s basically around what previous two-dimensional Mario games offered, like Super Mario World, and that’s disappointing. The adventure could have and I think should have been longer. Now that’s not to say that I didn’t enjoy playing through the levels or I didn’t find the game to be challenging, but the game felt short to me. Other areas in which the game fell short in my mind is the music and bosses.

        The music in this game is pretty bland and fails to include memorable pieces from previous Mario games. Music is recycled again and again in levels and follows the same basic composition with some variation here and there. This takes away a little from the uniqueness of the levels. I wasn’t expecting a new piece of music in every level, but when six or seven levels within a ten level world contain the same exact music, and at least two others carry music that’s identical in each level, that’s what I call a disappointment. The music doesn’t add to the “mood” of the level or convey much “emotion” or come across as “rich” or “full of

        depth” like a good soundtrack should. Then there’s the boss battles. They’re ridiculously easy, except for the final boss which incorporated a clever and difficult platforming challenge that ultimately proved to be real satisfying, and although each boss battle is a little different, such as one involving water and another taking place in the air, the bosses were easy to defeat within just a few minutes. In most instances, I had to just jump in the head of the boss three times, and that was it. I did like the boss battles involving Bowser Jr. though as they required more skill and good timing to beat.

        I did enjoy playing through this game as it did offer about ten or twelve new concepts to the two-dimensional Mario game series that hadn’t yet been done, so playing through this game did feel like a step-up from previous two-dimensional Mario games. The degree of challenge offered was nice, except for the boss battles in general. What hurts this game though is the lackluster and uninspired soundtrack as well as the short levels and overall number of total levels. I expected more from the Wii since it’s amount of storage capacity and power is so much greater than that of the Super Nintendo Entertainment System. Still though, I had fun playing through the game and so I believe it to be deserving of a “7″ rating.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in June, 2010. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 283061125340930/k2311a063/6.3.10
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