Tenspeed and Brown Shoe: Savage Says “What Are Friends For?” TV Show  » TV  »
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  • They make a quick quip about it, and I thought it was cute and very tongue and cheek

    • by Orrymain
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      From 1980, Tenspeed and Brown Shoe: Savage Says “What Are Friends For?” was the first one not directed and written by series creator, Steven J. Cannell, and it showed. While the essence of the wonderful characters of E.L. ‘Tenspeed’ Turner, played brilliantly by Ben Vereen, and Lionel Whitney, portrayed supremely by the dry witted Jeff Goldblum, are there, the story isn’t quite as enrapturing as the first two episodes were.

      There’s even a part of street scene that I didn’t like


      because we’re supposed to be following Tenspeed and Brown Shoe as they are walking and talking and it’s really hard to make them out. In fact, at one point, I couldn’t see them at all. If it had been a shorter instance, it wouldn’t have mattered, but it ran too long before cutting to the actors, so that was a turnoff for me.

      There were a couple of bits I really liked early on, however. Our private detectives are ...


      • trying to collect a debt owed by a man named Vickers, who owns a tailor shop. The man just hasn’t paid them, so Tenspeed goes in and acts like he’s an Arab sheik’s assistant and ends up walking away with the equivalent of what is owed to the detective agency in men’s suits, all which fit him and not the taller and slimmer Whitney.

        At the beginning of that bit is a scene where the two luckily get a parking space

        right out front on the street without having to drive around the block for ages. They make a quick quip about it, and I thought it was cute and very tongue and cheek.

        I didn’t feel any of the guest stars were all that great, but of note were Jim Murtaugh and Martin Kove, who were at least somewhat intriguing. The story was okay and had some moments, but the little flaws like the street scene kept it from being better.



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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in May, 2010. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 1027051111730431/k2311a0527/5.27.10
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