Paul Rivas’s The Cheater’s Diet  » Health  »
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  • I came across The Cheater’s Diet recently, and must admit I thought at first it was related to the television show of the same name
  • Instead it is the product of several years experience in working with some 15,000 bariatric patients
  • Statistically speaking, while his ducks may be in a row, I am less impressed with the overall approach to the diet plan itself
  • While I agree wholeheartedly that many diets are bland, and too many diets require that you give up entire food groups
  • Though he prefaces his cheat directions with a mild admonishment about personal “binge” trigger foods, I wonder if he realizes he is at once telling us to eat anything we want, and then nullifying the entire premise of the diet by telling us to avoid our most favorite foods of all

    • by Jude244
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      I came across The Cheater’s Diet recently, and must admit I thought at first it was related to the television show of the same name. I briefly even imagined Cheater’s host Joey Greco popping up out of nowhere, and ordering you to put down the bag of pork rinds and beer.

      Paul Rivas’s Cheater’s Diet however, is nowhere near as animated I ‘m afraid. Instead it is the product of several years experience in working with some 15,000 bariatric patients. In this diet, we learn the reasons why 95 % diets fail, and how most will fizzle out in the first 6 to 12 months alone. Rivas also details how of the people who actually do loss weight, over 90 percent will gain it all back within two years. Statistically speaking, while his ducks may be in a row, I am less impressed with the overall approach to the diet plan itself.


      Essentially, the Cheater’s Diet proposes that most diets fail due to the overarching deprivation-like tactics popularly used, and the general monotony of their choices. While I agree wholeheartedly that many diets are bland, and too many diets require that you give up entire food groups; I lose enthusiasm when it comes to the “cheating” part. If it really were possible to eat all the fattening foods we love and still lose weight, why on earth has obesity touched some many lives?

      Even more troublesome, Rivas proposes that dieters with willpower exceeding that of an average diets lifespan of six weeks will be rewarded with a slower metabolism, and an evolutionary-fixed hoarding and housing of calories into fat cells. Again though there may be data to support such findings, it’s the whole trash your diet with cheat days thing that completely irks me.

      How is this method sound in light of ...


      • deprivation/binge eating disorders? Is it not more of a shock to the system to avoid things such as sugar Monday through Friday and then go off the deep end on the weekend? I can’t help but feel this diet manages to undo a weeks worth of healthy habits, and sets up its dieter for a downward spiral.

        The diet plan consists of calorie calibrated weekend cheat sheets. Regardless of what diet plan you use during the week, you must increase your two day intake from between 1,000-2,400 calories during the 36 hour window. That’s a lot of calories over what you may already be eating on your diet. I would hate to have to try to burn those off at a gym on Monday. Even if your metabolism were to speed up temporarily, who’s to say it’s enough to burn up an extra 2,400 calorie windfall.

        The second tenet of

        this diabolical diet is that you can eat anything you want during the cheat cycle. Why is this a problem? Well could be that your cheat foods are the reason you are overweight? Is it possible that being knee deep in French fries, and face down in box of Dunkin Donuts may not help you anymore now than it did when you were blissfully unaware of the Cheaters Diet? While I may not liken a donut to a loaded gun, I wouldn’t want either of them waved in my face.

        Though he prefaces his cheat directions with a mild admonishment about personal “binge” trigger foods, I wonder if he realizes he is at once telling us to eat anything we want, and then nullifying the entire premise of the diet by telling us to avoid our most favorite foods of all.

        So much for cheating, what’s the point then?




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