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  • The first time I picked up this book, I found it quite difficult to get into, so I put it down
  • The risks, bribes and corruption needed to simply survive are horrifying to imagine and made me feel so grateful for the relative freedom I enjoy in my own life
  • Make up your own mind, but it definitely seems there are more fingers in this pie than first meets the eye

    • by Joycee Riches
      TRUSTWORTHY

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      Latifa - My Forbidden Face.

      Growing Up Under the Taliban: A Young Woman’s Story.

      ISBN: 1-86049-960-0

      This is an autobiographical account of a young woman living in Afghanistan growing up under the Taliban regime.

      The first time I picked up this book, I found it quite difficult to get into, so I put it down. I finally read it all the way through once I had finished A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini (author of the Kite Runner) which gave me a good background into the political and historical events that have shaped today’s Afghanistan. This book covers Afghan political events in more detail and those who are already familiar with this country’s history will find it easier to


      understand exactly who is who.

      The horrors of living under the Taliban are presented so confrontingly that you cannot fail to be moved by her story. Living in a virtual prison, young girls with promising careers are forced to hide themselves away both in their homes and under their clothing. They cannot step out of doors without a male relative, they cannot work and submission is necessary for their own survival.

      As the author has studied journalism, the book is written a little like a report. The facts are stated but as the author describes the way people in her family suppressed their emotions in order to cope, she has also managed to detached herself a little emotionally. In a ...


      • way, this is good, as I can imagine her own emotions would be so raw and confronting that it may have become quite unpleasant to read.

        There are times in the book where the author jumps forwards and backwards in time, which can become a little frustrating, however all events described are necessary to illustrate the suffering of her own family and her own frustration with the status quo.

        The risks, bribes and corruption needed to simply survive are horrifying to imagine and made me feel so grateful for the relative freedom I enjoy in my own life.

        This gripping story also gave me a greater insight into the Muslim culture. For most Muslims, this Taliban extremist view of the Koran

        is abhorrent and goes against everything they have ever been taught. After reading this, I find it extremely frustrating when all Muslim people are tarred with the same brush.

        There are many conspiracy theories surrounding who actually has backed the Taliban and the motivations behind the taking of Afghanistan, which the author does touch on. Make up your own mind, but it definitely seems there are more fingers in this pie than first meets the eye.

        If you are looking to learn something about the world around you, this book will really highlight the suffering that people - particularly women - endured under the Taliban. After reading this book, I pray that my daughters will never have to endure anything as horrific as this regime.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in May, 2010. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 1710051087560831/k2311a0510/5.10.10
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