Halfords AA alkaline batteries
3.5
2 votes
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  • Most of the time I play it safe and stick to the more well known market leading brands such as Duracell or Energizer, but every once in a while I like to have a look at something rather different from the norm, and so it was that recently I picked up a pack of Halfords' own brand batteries
  • These batteries are nothing particularly to shout about when it comes to price - they cost a few pounds per four pack, just like almost every one of their rivals, and again like most of those they are slightly cheaper than the market leaders
  • I don't think I have ever seen them outside of an actual Halfords shop, so I would assume that this is the only place that they are sold, unless of course you want to mess around on eBay or another online shop or auction site and incur annoying extra postage charges which will in all likelihood make getting them very poor value for money and much more expensive than simply picking up a pack of Duracells from the local supermarket
  • As you would expect, there is no mercury in these batteries, although since I believe that European Union regulations have banned mercury for some years now I am not entirely sure why Halfords still feel the need to state this explicitly on the side, along with the infamous crossed out wheelie bin logo reminding you to take used batteries for recycling rather than simply throwing them in the trash
  • I don't think it is worth making a special trip to Halfords just to buy these batteries, but if you happen to be in one of their stores in any case then I can't see any reason not to pick them up

    • by fredhound
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      Since I own an awful lot of battery powered electronic devices, and since most of those take the very common AA size, I am forever wanting to try out new types. Most of the time I play it safe and stick to the more well known market leading brands such as Duracell or Energizer, but every once in a while I like to have a look at something rather different from the norm, and so it was that recently I picked up a pack of Halfords’ own brand batteries. I was quite intrigued, because I had not at that time used them at all before, but I was also just a little bit apprehensive about whether they would live up to my needs and expectations.

      These batteries are nothing particularly to shout about when it comes to price - they


      cost a few pounds per four pack, just like almost every one of their rivals, and again like most of those they are slightly cheaper than the market leaders. I don’t think I have ever seen them outside of an actual Halfords shop, so I would assume that this is the only place that they are sold, unless of course you want to mess around on eBay or another online shop or auction site and incur annoying extra postage charges which will in all likelihood make getting them very poor value for money and much more expensive than simply picking up a pack of Duracells from the local supermarket!

      The most striking feature of these batteries is their colour scheme. So many of the own brand batteries put out by one firm and another are designed to make them look ...


      • like the most famous brands, but Halfords have gone in a completely different direction. These batteries follow the chain’s relatively recent branding in being mostly a very bright orange, with the chain’s logo in black and also black stripes at either end. I rather like it, as a matter of fact, and think that it is quite attractive. I certainly found it refreshing to see something new.

        As you would expect, there is no mercury in these batteries, although since I believe that European Union regulations have banned mercury for some years now I am not entirely sure why Halfords still feel the need to state this explicitly on the side, along with the infamous crossed out wheelie bin logo reminding you to take used batteries for recycling rather than simply throwing them in the trash. They are made in

        China, which is probably not much of a concern these days even if I would have preferred them to have been European made.

        In use, these batteries do their job perfectly well. I have not really used them for long enough and in enough devices to be able to say with absolute certainty how long they last, but my impression has been that while they do not quite measure up to Duracells in this area they are not far behind, and probably close enough that their small price advantage manages to overcome it in terms of overall value. I don’t think it is worth making a special trip to Halfords just to buy these batteries, but if you happen to be in one of their stores in any case then I can’t see any reason not to pick them up.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in April, 2010. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 1615041060631230/k2311a0415/4.15.10
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