The Original Game Boy/ Game Boy Pocket
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  • Now, back when I was a kid, I enjoyed Pokémon, and to be fair, they’re legitimately well made games, but I eventually grew out of them so I am not too fond of the games anymore, but I would play the older ones on the Game Boy for nostalgia sake
  • Still, the Game Boy had a great library, but the biggest problem with the Game Boy, is that it’s a black and white game console

    • by Shintai
      TRUSTWORTHY

      all reviews
      The original Nintendo Game Boy and the Game Boy Pocket is essentially the same thing. The only true differences between these two, is that the Game Boy Pocket comes in multiple colors like green, it’s smaller, and it requires less batteries. Also, the screen isn’t quite as green. Other than that, the two of these are pretty much the same thing. Still, I am saying this right here, between the two, you’re better off getting the Pocket unless you’re an avid collector.

      The original Nintendo Game Boy wasn’t the first portable gaming system ever made, but it’s the one that made them mainstream. Hell, these damn things were so popular, executives in their offices would be playing Tetris on them, and that’s not some crazy exaggeration or something, stuff like that actually happened when this thing came out, that’s how popular it was, and


      for good reason, it was a really good system with some great games. Now its competition at the time was the Sega Game Gear, which the Game Gear, while not a bad system, just took up way too many batteries and ate them up way too quickly, compared to the Game Boy which only used 4 AA batteries and the system lasted for much longer. Now I want to talk about just how damn nearly indestructible these things are. Ok, if you get a sledgehammer, fine, you’ve got a broken Game Boy, but a true story, is that there was, for some odd reason, a Game Boy in the middle a nuclear explosion, and the damn thing survived.

      The plastic on it is all melted, but the thing actually turns on and works. How insane is that!? It actually still works, unbelievable!


      • Now, the actual console itself has only 4 buttons, the B and A buttons, and the start and select buttons, and of course the directional pad. Having only two buttons made the games fairly simple, but simplicity isn’t always a bad thing, and not all the games were completely simple.

        Speaking of games, the original Game Boy had some kick ass games. Games like The Legend of Zelda: Link’s Awakening, Metroid 2: Return of Samus, Tetris, Ducktales, and of course the infamous Pokémon games. Now, back when I was a kid, I enjoyed Pokémon, and to be fair, they’re legitimately well made games, but I eventually grew out of them so I am not too fond of the games anymore, but I would play the older ones on the Game Boy for nostalgia sake. Still, the Game Boy had a great library, but

        the biggest problem with the Game Boy, is that it’s a black and white game console. Back then though a portable gaming console was pretty new technology, so you can forgive the lack of color, but then came the Game Boy Color. This, pretty much made the original Game Boy, and Game Boy Pocket equally useless because the Game Boy Color, which is getting its own review, is a step up from its predecessor.

        So yeah, it’s a revolutionary hand held, but the Game Boy Color is a much better hand held that plays the same games, but in color and needs less batteries to work, and last longer. Still, I am going to give this at least a 6 out of a 10. Honestly it’s a bit lower, but the thing is, it really helped the gaming industry, so I give it at least some respect.




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    The review was published as it's written by reviewer in April, 2010. The reviewer certified that no compensation was received from the reviewed item producer, trademark owner or any other institution, related with the item reviewed. The site is not responsible for the mistakes made. 1612041056690630/k2311a0412/4.12.10
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