Martin Chuzzlewit by Charles Dickesn novel  » Books  »
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  • This is one of the passages that I like best with the book, although it’s description of the States as a wilderness filled with hillbillies and frauds is a bit over the top, it’s very funny
  • As usual, the good female characters are more or less boring
  • The main male characters, Martin Chuzzlewit, isn’t very interesting either in my opinion, but the minor characters are interesting (both the serious and the comical) and makes the novel well worth reading

    • by Fotorunn
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      Martin Chuzzlewit, or The Life and Adventures of Martin Chuzzlewit , is the novel Dickens himself considered to be his best work. It didn’t get the same popularity as his earlier works, so while he worked on it, he changed the story and sent his characters to America.

      This gave him the opportunity to describe the United States, which he had


      just visited (1842).

      This is one of the passages that I like best with the book, although it’s description of the States as a wilderness filled with hillbillies and frauds is a bit over the top, it’s very funny.

      The book tells the story of the Chuzzlewit family, and although the ending is happy for some, most of the characters meet ...


      • more or less tragic ends.

        It’s not as funny as Dickens former books, and the bad guys are even worse.

        There’s no hope of redemption for most of them.

        It’s well written, the descriptions of both England and the States are great.

        As usual, the good female characters are more or less boring.

        The main male characters, Martin Chuzzlewit, isn’t very

        interesting either in my opinion, but the minor characters are interesting (both the serious and the comical) and makes the novel well worth reading.

        There are not too many characters in this book.

        Some of Dickens book, like the Pickwick papers, has enough characters to fight a minor war, but this book has just enough so it is easy to keep them apart.




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